En Español

Election Administration in Arizona

Expand All Collapse All

Election Types and Dates

Election Dates

Upcoming Primary Elections

The primary election will be held on August 30, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-201 [link]

Arizona 2016 Elections Calendar [link]

Upcoming General Elections

The general election will be held on November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-204 [link]

Arizona 2016 Elections Calendar [link]

How is a nominee determined?

How is a nominee determined (caucus, primary, convention)?

At a primary election, each political party nominates its candidates for elective offices to be filled at such election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-302 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-301 [link]

Political Party Affiliation

Can voters register by party in the state?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Arizona Voter Registration Application [link]

Register to Vote or Update Your Current Voter Information [link]

Must voters be registered with a political party if they would like to vote on that party’s candidates in a partisan primary election (i.e., are primaries open or closed)?

Arizona's primaries are partially open. Voters registered as independent, no party preference, or members of a party without ballot recognition may vote in the partisan primary election of their choice. Voters registered in a recognized political party may vote only the primary election ballot for their political party.

However, an exception applies presidential preference primary elections. In these elections, only voters registered with a party can vote in that party's primary.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Const. Art. VII, § 10 [link]

Arizona 2016 Election Information [link]

When can a voter change or switch their party affiliation?

Changes of political party must be filed by the voter registration deadline to take effect for that election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Arizona Voter Registration Application [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-136 [link]

Register to Vote or Update Your Current Voter Information [link]

Voter Registration

Who Can Vote?

What are the state's residency requirements for voters?

In order to vote, a person must have lived in Arizona 29 days before the election. A person is a resident if they have actual physical presence in Arizona with intent to remain.

If a person does not live at a permanent or private structure, the person may provide the address of the homeless shelter to which they regularly return, the place at which they are a resident, the county courthouse in the county where they live, or a general delivery address for a post office covering the location where they are a resident. A person who is otherwise qualified to register may not be refused registration or declared not qualified to vote because the person does not live in a permanent, private or fixed structure.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-101 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-121(B)-(C) [link]

Can someone pre-register to vote if they will not be 18 years old by the next election? If so, who?

No. A person may only register to vote if they will be 18 years old by the next general election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-121(A) [link]

Ariz. Res. Stat. § 16-101 [link]

Can 17-year-olds who will be 18-year-olds by the general election vote in the primary?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-121(A) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-101 [link]

Does the state take away the right to vote from persons convicted of certain crimes? If so, what crimes?

Yes, and the state cancels voter registration for a person that is convicted of a felony crime and the judgment of conviction has not been set aside or reversed.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-165 [link]

If people lose the right to vote because of a criminal conviction, can they regain the right to vote? How?

Yes. Arizona law automatically restores the right to vote to a person convicted of one felony upon completion of probation or receipt of an absolute discharge from imprisonment, and payment of any fines or restitution imposed. However, a new voter registration application needs to be completed and submitted prior to the voter registration deadline, as a felony conviction results in the cancellation of voter registration. •Restoration of civil rights for people convicted of two or more felonies is granted at the discretion of the reviewing superior court judge. * A person convicted of two or more state felonies and sentenced to a prison term may apply to have their right to vote restored by the superior court judge (or that judge's successor) who imposed the original sentence. The person must: (1) make the application to the superior court judge who imposed the sentence; (2) include a certificate of absolute discharge from the Department of Corrections; and (3) apply no sooner than two years after completing their sentence. * A person convicted of two or more state felonies who is sentenced to probation may have their right to vote restored by the judge discharging them at the end of the term of probation. * A person convicted of two or more federal felonies and sentenced to a prison term may apply to the superior court in the district where they live for restoration of their right to vote if the person has received an absolute discharge from prison. * A person convicted of two or more federal felonies who is sentenced to probation may have their civil rights restored upon application to the clerk of the superior court in the county where the person now resides. * A person convicted of a criminal offense, after completing conditions of probation or sentence and discharge by the court, may apply to the judge or magistrate who enacted the sentence to have the judgment of guilt set aside. If the judge or magistrate grants the application, they will set aside judgment of guilt, dismiss the accusation and release person from penalties.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-906 (two or more felonies) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-908 (discretion of superior court judge) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-910(A) (two or more felonies and absolute discharge) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-907 (applying to judge to set guilt aside) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-912(A) (persons with one felony) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-909(A) (two or more felonies with completed probation) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-911 (discretion of superior court judge) [link]

Voter Registration Options

Is fully online voter registration available? (i.e., can voters fill in and submit an online application without printing and signing it?)

Yes. Click here to go to the site.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Admin. Code R2-12-605 (C) & (D) (see page 5) [link]

Ariz. Admin. Code R2-12-601 (see page 5) [link]

Register to Vote or Update Your Current Voter Information [link]

Does the state accept the National Mail Registration Form?

Yes, but people who register to vote using the National Mail Registration Form can only vote in federal elections in Arizona. People who register using this form do not have to provide proof of their citizenship.

To vote in both state and federal elections in Arizona, a person must register to vote using Arizona's state voter registration form and provide with it proof of the person's citizenship, such as:

  • Writing the person's Arizona driver's license number on the form
  • Writing the person's Alien Registration Number on the application
  • Writing the person's Indian Census Number, Bureau of Indian Affairs Card Number, Tribal Treaty Card Number, or Tribal Enrollment Number
  • Providing a legible photocopy of a birth certificate that verifies citizenship and supporting legal documentation (i.e. marriage certificate) if the name on the birth certificate is not the same as the person's current legal name
  • Providing a legible photocopy of the pertinent pages of a passport
  • Presentation to the County Recorder of U.S. naturalization documents
  • Providing a legible photocopy of a Tribal Certificate of Indian Blood or Tribal or Bureau of Indian Affairs Affidavit of Birth.
Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Arizona's State Voter Registration Application [link]

National Mail Registration Form [link]

Arizona Secretary of State's website [link]

Is the state required to register voters at public assistance agencies and driver's license agencies, per the National Voter Registration Act of 1993?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-140(A) [link]

Student-Specific Rules

Does the state have specific rules on students registering to vote or voting?

A student does not gain or lose their residence because of their presence at or absence from a state while at an institution of learning. Students attending college in Arizona can establish residency in Arizona if they have a present intention to remain at their Arizona school address. Voting in Arizona may be a declaration of residency that may make an individual subject to other laws applicable to Arizona residents. Students who attend school out of state but wish to vote in Arizona may do so as long as they have not committed to residency in another state.

A student's residency may be challenged at the polls by any registered voter of that county or by a challenger appointed by the County Chairman of a political party.

An unemancipated minor attending college in Arizona whose parents are non-residents of the state may register to vote in Arizona when they reach the age of 18.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-101(B) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-591 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-593(A)(2) [link]

Brennan Center Student Voting Guide [link]

Voter Registration Deadlines

When is the voter registration deadline?

At least 29 days before an election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-134 [link]

How is the deadline enforced for mailed applications?

The voter registration application will be accepted if either:

  • The application is postmarked by the voter registration deadline AND must be received by 7 p.m. on Election Day; or
  • The application must be dated 29 days or more before an election AND be received by the county recorder by first-class mail within 5 days after the voter registration deadline.
Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-134 [link]

How is the deadline enforced for online applications?

The application must be completed by the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 1904-01-01)

Service Arizona FAQ [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-134 [link]

When must a voter make changes to their registration for the changes to be in effect before the person seeks to vote?

A voter must update their voter registration at least 29 days in advance of the next election in order for that registration to be effective.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat.§ 16-125 [link]

Voter Registration Drives

Does the state require organizations conducting voter registration drives to register?

No.

Are there restrictions on getting voter registration forms?

No. The county recorder may provide voter registration forms in quantity to groups and individuals that request forms for conducting voter registration drives. The Secretary of State must also make the federal voter registration form available for distribution through governmental and private entities.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-131 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-151 [link]

Does the state require any training in order to conduct voter registration drives?

No.

Does the state have restrictions on who may help others register to vote?

Arizona law does not address this issue.

Does the state have restrictions on paying drive workers, or additional rules related to payment?

Deputy registrars appointed by county recorders to distribute registration forms, to assist in registering voters and to accept completed forms must serve without pay. However, it is not mandatory that registration drives involve deputy registrars. There are no other restrictions on whether voter registration workers may be paid.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-131(d) [link]

Are there restrictions on the voter registration drive offering something of value to a person in exchange for completing a voter registration application?

Federal law states that whoever "pays or offers to pay or accepts payment either for registration to vote or for voting shall be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than five years." At least one federal appellate court has interpreted "payment" as "intended to include forms of pecuniary value offered or given directly to an individual voter, and indicated the value should be based on "an assessment of the monetary worth of an item from the perspective of the voter receiving the item." That case held that food vouchers could be "payment."

Another example is California's Secretary of State's interpretation of the federal law to mean that "Any type of incentive is considered 'payment,' even things as seemingly innocent as cookies or admission to an entertainment event."

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

52 U.S.C. § 10307(c) [link]

California Secretary of State's Guide to Voter Registration Drives, p. 11 [link]

United States v. Garcia, 719 F.2d 99, 102-103 (5th Cir. 1983) [link]

Must the registration drive worker sign the completed voter registration application, and must the drive or canvasser place other information on applications?

If the applicant is unable to sign the application and the voter registration drive worker filled it out at the applicant’s direction, the voter registration drive worker must sign their name on the application.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-152 [link]

Does the state have a rule requiring a receipt or other tracking information to be provided to the applicant?

No. Arizona law states that a duplicate voter receipt shall be provided with the state form that provides space for the name, street address and city of residence of the applicant, party preference and the date of signing. The voter receipt is evidence of valid registration for the purpose of casting a provisional ballot. Arizona law does not address the use of the receipt by voter registration drives.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-152 [link]

Are there restrictions on copying completed voter registration applications prior to submitting them to the election official, or other restrictions on data entry or disclosure?

Arizona law does not address copying of completed applications. However, it is a class 6 felony to distribute, post, or otherwise provide access through the internet to information derived from voter registration forms, except as authorized by the section of law regarding the county recorder’s and secretary of state’s protection of access to voter registration information. Information derived from registration forms may be used only for purposes relating to a political or political party activity, political campaign or election, for revising election district boundaries, or for any other purpose specifically authorized by law and may not be used for a commercial purpose as defined by law; violation is a class 6 felony.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168(E)-(F) [link]

Is there a time limit for voter registration groups to submit the voter registration applications they collect?

No, but groups must submit applications by the voter registration deadline for applicants to be able to vote in that election.

What are the consequences for failing to submit applications on time?

Arizona election law does not address this issue. However, it is a class 2 misdemeanor for any authorized person to intentionally fail to submit completed registration materials as provided by the election law.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-28)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-181 [link]

Same-Day Registration

Can voters register and vote on the same day (i.e., does the state offer same-day registration)?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

http://www.ncsl.org/legislatures-elections/elections/same-day-registration.aspx [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-134 [link]

Voters Who Have Moved or Changed Their Name

Can people vote if they moved, but did not update their voter registration with their new address?

An voter who moves from the address they are registered to another address within the same county, and who fails to notify the county recorder before the date of election is allowed to correct the records at the appropriate polling place for the voter's new address, after presenting identification including the updated address. After correcting the address, they may vote through provisional ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-135 [link]

Can people vote if they have changed their name, but did not update their voter registration with their new name?

A person changing their name can reregister and state on the new affidavit of registration the voter's former legal name. An voter may also correct the voter registration record by providing the new name while voting a provisional ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-137 [link]

Language, Literacy, and Disability Access

Language and Literacy Access

Does the state have any places that must provide election materials in languages other than English, per Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 requires certain counties in Arizona to provide all materials related to elections, including registration and voting notices, forms, instructions, assistance, ballots, or other materials or information, in minority languages. The Arizona counties and languages are as follows:

  • Apache County - Navajo
  • Apache County - Pueblo
  • Coconino County - Hopi
  • Coconino County - Navajo
  • Coconino County - Yuma
  • Maricopa County - Tohono O'Odham
  • Maricopa County - Spanish
  • Mohave County - Yuma
  • Navajo County - Hopi
  • Navajo County - Navajo
  • Pima County - Tohono O'Odham
  • Pima County - Yaqui
  • Pima County - Spanish
  • Pinal County - Tohono O'Odham
  • Santa Cruz County - Spanish
  • Yavapi County - Yuma
  • Yuma County - Yuma
  • Yuma County - Spanish

Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act states, "whenever any state or political subdivision (covered by this section) provides registration or voting notices, forms, instructions, assistance or other materials or information relating to the voteral process, including ballots, it shall provide them in the language of the applicable minority group as well as in the English language." Most Native American languages are unwritten so information must be orally transmitted.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, 76 Fed. Reg. 63602 (Oct. 13, 2011) [link]

Who can help a voter with reading assistance or translation if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote due to inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union. Under state law, any voter may be assisted by a person of the voter's own choice or be assisted by two election officials, one from each major political party. A person who is a candidate for an office in that election other than the office of precinct committeeman is not eligible to assist any voter. People who have been employed by or volunteered for a candidate, campaign, political party or political organization in the election being voted on are also ineligible to assist voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-580(G) [link]

Disability Access

Who can help a voter with a disability if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote due to inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union. Under state law, any voter may be assisted by a person of the voter's own choice or be assisted by two election officials, one from each major political party. A person who is a candidate for an office in that election other than the office of precinct committeeman is not eligible to assist any voter. People who have been employed by or volunteered for a candidate, campaign, political party or political organization in the election being voted on are also ineligible to assist voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-580(G) [link]

Does the state have other rules related to access for persons with disabilities?

If the board of supervisors determines that a polling place is inaccessible to elderly persons or persons with disabilities, it will provide for alternative voting according to procedures established by the chief election officer or the state pursuant to the voting accessibility for the elderly and handicapped act.

Voters may sign up to be on the Permanent Early Voter List (PEVL) and have ballots sent to their home as long as they are eligible to vote.

A qualified voter who is confined due to continued illness or physical disability and cannot go to polls on the day of election may make a verbal or signed request to the county recorder to have a personally delivered ballot by the special election board to their place of confinement. Such requests must be made by 5:00pm on the second Friday before the election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-549 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-581 [link]

Early Voting, Absentee Voting, and Other Ways to Vote

Vote-by-Mail

Does the state provide mail ballots to all voters without a request?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Voting in This Election [link]

Early Voting/Absentee In-Person Voting

Does the state have early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Yes

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-541(A) [link]

Where does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

Early voting takes place in the county recorder's office and, in some counties, at other designated sites throughout the county. Contact the county recorder for additional early voting locations. All counties

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542(A) [link]

When does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

Voters may cast early ballots beginning as soon as the ballots are available, approximately 33 days before primary and general elections and 26 days before the presidential preference election. Early voting ends at 5 p.m. on the Friday before the election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542(E) [link]

What official chooses early voting/absentee in-person voting locations?

The county recorder

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542(A) [link]

Are lists of early voters/absentee in-person voters published? How?

Yes, by request of the county or state party chairman. Candidates should also able to obtain these lists by request, though procedures differ by county (available by public records request which may include a fee in at least one county).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168(D) [link]

Absentee Voting by Mail

Can anyone vote absentee by mail without an excuse? If not, what excuses allow a voter to vote absentee by mail?

Yes

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-541(A) [link]

Deadline to apply for absentee ballot by mail

The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot to be mailed is 5 p.m. on the 11th day before the election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542(E) [link]

How does a voter apply for an absentee mail ballot?

An voter may request an absentee ballot in person, by telephone, by mail, by e-mail or by submitting the online form (in counties that have one) to the county recorder. If the request is made in person or by telephone, the voter must provide their date of birth and state or country of birth or other information that if compared to the voter registration information on file would confirm the identity of the voter. Requests in writing may be on an official form from the county or by writing to the recorder and including the voter's name and address as registered, birthdate, election for which the ballot is requested, address where the ballot is to be mailed, and signature.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542(A) [link]

Can a voter make an online request for an absentee mail ballot?

Yes, in some counties. Click [here] (http://www.azsos.gov/election/county.htm) for the list of counties.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Contact Information for County Election Officials [link]

Does a voter need to submit any supporting documentation or verification with an absentee mail ballot or absentee mail ballot application? If so, what is required?

Voter must submit both the ballot and an affidavit

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-548 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-547 [link]

Are there restrictions on who may request or turn in an absentee mail ballot application for a voter?

A voter may make a verbal or signed request for an official early ballot. Only the voter may be in possession of their unvoted early ballot. A voter may give an early ballot request form to a candidate, political committee, or other organization. A candidate, political committee, or other organization that receives a completed early ballot form must be submitted within 6 days to the political subdivision that will conduct the election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542(A) & (D) & (J) [link]

Deadline to return absentee ballots

Ballot must be delivered to the office of the county recorder or other officer in charge of elections, or any polling place in the county, no later than 7:00pm on election day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-547(C) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-551(C) [link]

Are there restrictions on who may return a voter's absentee mail ballot for them?

Yes. Only the following persons may return an absentee ballot for a voter:

  • A family member of the voter who is related by blood, marriage, adoption, or legal guardianship
  • Someone who lives at the same address as the voter
  • A caregiver who provides the voter with medical or health care assistance at a residence, nursing care institution, hospice facility, assisted living center, assisted living facility, assisted living home, residential care institution, adult day health care facility or adult foster care home
Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-23)

Ariz. H.B. 2023 (2016) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1005 [link]

What are absentee ballots sent by mail usually called?

Early Ballot

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-246 [link]

Are there any special emergency rules that allow a voter to vote absentee by mail if they are unable to make it to the polls at the last minute?

Yes, if any unforeseen circumstances will prevent a voter from voting at the polls on Election Day occurs between 5 p.m. on the second Friday before the election and 5 p.m. the day before the election, the county recorder may make special provisions to allow that voter to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542 [link]

Are lists of people who vote absentee by mail published? How?

The process to obtain the list varies by county, but usually the counties have arrangements made with the parties and they give the list to the parties, who disseminate it to the candidates. Third-party groups may be able to obtain these lists via public records requests.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168(H) [link]

Presidential-only ballots

Under federal law, any registered voter who moves out of the state after the 30th day before a Presidential election may vote for President and Vice President either in person at the voter’s previous state of residence or using an absentee ballot from the voter’s previous state of residence.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

52 U.S.C. § 10502(E) [link]

Absentee Voting for Military and Overseas Voters

Who is eligible for military/overseas absentee voting?

A person eligible to vote as an overseas or military voter is:

  • A member of a uniformed service on active duty who, by reason of such active duty, is absent from the place of residence where the member is otherwise qualified to vote
  • A member of the merchant marine who, by reason of service in the merchant marine, is absent from the place of residence where the member is otherwise qualified to vote
  • A spouse or dependent of a member referred to above who, by reason of the active duty or service of the member, is absent from the place of residence where the spouse or dependent is otherwise qualified to vote
  • A person who resides outside the United States and is qualified to vote in the last place in which the person was domiciled before leaving the United States, or
  • A person who resides outside the United States and (but for such residence) would be qualified to vote in the last place in which the person was domiciled before leaving the United States
Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-543 [link]

Out-of-County Military/Overseas Voter Registration Information [link]

How do voters apply for a military/overseas ballot?

Military and overseas personnel may vote through requesting an early ballot online. The form can either be filled out on the website or may be faxed or mailed in.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-543 [link]

Military and Overseas Voters [link]

Deadline to apply for a military/overseas ballot

The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot to be mailed is 5 p.m. on the 11th day before the election. However, if a military or overseas voter applies between that time and 7 p.m. on Election Day, after this time a voter may cast a federal write-in absentee ballot to vote for federal offices only, so long as it the ballot is received by 7:00 p.m. on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-542(E) [link]

Federal Voting Assistance Program Arizona [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-543.02(A)-(B) [link]

Deadline to return the military/overseas ballot

7 p.m. on Election Day. County recorders' offices will remain open until 7 p.m. on Election Day to accept absentee ballots. Absentee ballots may also be dropped off at any polling place in the voter's county of residence no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day. The ballot must be received by the deadline to count.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Federal Voting Assistance Program Arizona [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-547(C) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-551(C) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-543.02(B) [link]

Who is eligible to use a write-in absentee ballot? How does it work?

A military or overseas voter may use a federal write-in absentee ballot (FWAB) in a primary, general or special election for the offices of presidential voter, United States Senator and Representative in Congress, if the voter applies for an early ballot before 7 p.m. on Election Day and does not receive the absentee ballot in time to vote.

Military and overseas voters who cannot vote a regular or official absentee ballot because of delayed mail delivery may request a special write-in early ballot for presidential voters, United States Senator and Representative in Congress. The voter may make the request on a federal post card application (FPCA). The FPCA must include a statement that due to military or other contingencies that preclude normal mail delivery, the voter cannot vote an absentee ballot during the normal early/absentee election period.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Federal Voting Assistance Program Arizona [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-543.01 [link]

On Election Day

Where do you vote in person?

Where do you vote in person?

Voters may go to the Arizona Secretary of State's website to locate their polling place. The Board of Supervisors designates one polling place within each precinct where the election must be held. Any change in location will be sent to voters by mail at least 33 days before the election. A public school is typically where the voting occurs.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-411(B)(4) [link]

Locate Your Polling Place [link]

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

6 a.m. - 7 p.m. Any voter standing in line at 7 p.m. is allowed to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-565 [link]

In the Voting Booth

Are there rules about what materials a voter can and cannot bring into the voting booth?

Voters are prohibited from showing another voter their or anyone's ballot after it is prepared for voting. Arizona prohibits voters from taking photos of ballots using cameras and cell phones.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1018 [link]

Can a voter bring children into the voting booth with them?

Yes

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-515(E) [link]

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Every registered voter is entitled to three consecutive hours to vote during the time polls are open to vote. Therefore, voters who do not have three consecutive hours before or after work while the polls are open may take time off of work at the beginning or end of their shift so that they have three consecutive hours to vote. Employers cannot penalize the voter's salary or wages for being absent for this time. However, the employee should request this time off from their employer the day before the election and arrange the times they will be absent from work.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-402 [link]

Campaigning, Electioneering, and Recording Devices

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering during early voting/absentee in-person voting?

It is illegal to interfere with a voter within 75 feet of the main outside entrance to an on-site early voting location established by a recorder. Individuals conducting business other than voting at a County Recorder's office or designated site for early voting may do so within 75 feet of the location where early voting is taking place so long as they do not engage in criminal conduct. However, outside of that 75-foot perimeter electioneering and political activity must be allowed (except in an emergency).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1014(A) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1018 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1006(A) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-411(H) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1017 [link]

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering on Election Day?

It is unlawful for any person to attempt to influence a person's vote on Election Day within a polling place or in a public manner within 75 feet of the main outside entrance of a polling place or an early voting site designated by the recorder. Except in the case of an emergency, any facility that is used as a polling place on Election Day shall allow persons to electioneer and engage in other political activity outside of the 75 foot limit in public areas and parking lots used by voters. Nobody may remain within 75 feet of the main outside entrance to the polling place while the polls are open, except people present for the purpose of voting, the election officials, Department of Justice Observers, and one appointed poll watcher of each political party represented on the ballot. Regular business activity that normally occurs at the polling place location may continue as long as it does not interfere with voting or constitute electioneering. However, outside of that 75-foot perimeter electioneering and political activity must be allowed (except in an emergency).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-09)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1018 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-411(H) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-515(A) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-590(A) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1017 [link]

Can a voter wear a button or t-shirt with a candidate's name or logo on it into the polling place when they vote?

No. Arizona campaign laws bar voters and poll workers from wearing anything with a political message within 75 feet of a polling site.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-515(I) [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

No, a voter cannot take photographs or videos in the voting booth or in the polling place.

(However, if the ballot is not marked in the polling place, as in the case of an absentee ballot, the voter may take a picture of their ballot and share it on the Internet.)

Source (confirmed on: 10/7/2016)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-515(G) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1018 [link]

*NEW 2** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) outside the polling place but within the zone around the polling place where campaigning/electioneering is banned?

You cannot take a video or record within 75 feet of the polling place. There is no prohibition in state law against making a call within the electioneering zone, but local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 10/7/2016)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-515(G) [link]

Who's at the Polls?

Can persons other than election workers observe inside the polls?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-590 [link]

What are observers inside the polls called in the state?

Party representatives and challengers.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-590 [link]

Does the state establish requirements to observe inside the polls?

The county chairman of each political party that has a candidate on the ballot in the precinct may appoint party representatives (and alternates) to the precinct's polling place. At the polling place, one of each party's party representatives may serve as a challenger.

No more than the number of party representatives for each party that were mutually agreed upon by each political party represented on the ballot can be in the polling place at one time. If such agreement cannot be reached, the number of representatives will be limited to one challenger at in the polling place at one time for each political party.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-590 (A) [link]

*NEW 3* Can a poll observer use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) in the polling place?

State law specifically prohibits photographs and videos except during a hand count of ballots. The use of cell phones for other purposes is not addressed, so local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 9/9/2016)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-515(G) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. §16-580 (Appointment of Challengers and Party Representatives) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-602(B) (Removal of ballots from ballot boxes;  disposition of ballots folded together or excessive ballots;  designated margin;  hand counts;  vote count verification committee) [link]

State of Arizona Elections Procedures Manual Politcal Party Observer Guidelines [link]

Are there other rules on what poll observers can or cannot do?

Challengers cannot enter any voting booth unless they are there to mark their own ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-590 [link]

Provisional Voting and Voters at the Wrong Polling Place

When should a voter be offered a provisional ballot?

Under Section 203 of the federal Help America Vote Act of 2002, if a person claims to be a registered voter in the jurisdiction in which the person desires to vote and the person claims to be eligible to vote in a federal election, but the person’s name does not appear on the official list of eligible voters for the polling place or an election official asserts that the person is not eligible to vote, then that person must be permitted to cast a provisional ballot at that polling place. The person may cast the provisional ballot after executing, before an election official at the polling place, a written affirmation stating that the person is (1) a registered voter in the jurisdiction, and (2) eligible to vote in that election.

Additionally, any person who votes in a federal election as a result of a federal or state court order, or any other order extending the time established for closing the polls by a state law in effect 10 days before the date of that election, may only vote in that election by casting a provisional ballot. Any such ballot cast must be separated and held apart from other provisional ballots cast for different reasons.

State law says a voter should be offered a provisional ballot if: * the voter has not provided sufficient identification at the polling location; * the voter's name does not appear on the signature roster or inactive list, and the voter has not moved; * the voter has moved; * the voter has been issued an early ballot; * the voter is hospitalized; * the voter has changed name; or * the voter is challenged at the polling place

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Elections Procedures Manual (Rev. 2014) (see page 151 on the PDF file) [link]

52 U.S.C. § 21082 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. §16-549 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-135 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. §16-513.01 [link]

If a voter casts a provisional ballot at the wrong precinct, will the ballot be counted?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-584(E) [link]

Following up on a provisional ballot

Voters may go [here] (https://voter.azsos.gov/VoterView/ProvisionalBallotSearch.do) to see if their provisional ballot was counted.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Provisional Ballot Search [link]

Finding out if a provisional ballot was counted

Voters may go [here] (https://voter.azsos.gov/VoterView/ProvisionalBallotSearch.do) to see if their provisional ballot was counted.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Provisional Ballot Search [link]

Ballot Shortages/Voting Machine Malfunctions

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a polling place runs out of printed ballots? Are handwritten/photocopied ballots allowed?

If the official ballots at an election precinct are not delivered at the time required, or if after the delivery they are lost, destroyed, or stolen, the election judges must immediately notify the clerk or other appropriate election official who prints ballots, and that official must provide printed or written ballots that voters in the election precinct must use.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-573 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-574 [link]

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a voting machine breaks or malfunctions?

If a broken machine breaks, attempts must be made to repair or replace the machine. Attempts to repair the machine must be made under the supervision of two elections board workers who are affiliated with different political parties. If a machine cannot be repaired or replaced, then printed or written paper ballots of any suitable form may be used for taking votes. Sample ballots may be used.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-574 [link]

Voter ID and Challenges

Voter ID

Who must show ID to vote?

All voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-579(A) [link]

Are there any special requirements for first-time voters?

First-time voters must register to vote at least twenty-nine (29) days before the election in which they intend to vote. Arizona has a bifurcated voter registration system. To be eligible to vote in state and federal elections (a "Full Ballot" voter), a voter must complete and submit either a federal or state registration application and provide proof of citizenship. Driver's or identification license numbers, copies of birth certificates or passports (including Certifications of Birth Abroad), U.S. naturalization documents or Alien Registration Numbers, Bureau of Indian Affairs Card Numbers, Tribal Treaty Card Numbers, Tribal Enrollment Numbers, or Census Numbers, or Tribal Certificates of Indian Bloor or Tribal or Bureau of Indian Affairs Affidavits of Birth are acceptable evidence of citizenship. If a voter chooses not to provide proof of citizenship, he or she may still vote in federal elections (a "FED Only" voter), by completing and submitting a federal registation form. This form requires the voter to swear under penalty of perjury that he or she meets the eligibility requirements, including citizenship, but does not require any other evidence of citizenship.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-120 [link]

Elections Procedures Manual [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-166(F) [link]

What ID is acceptable?

Voters must provide one of the following:

  1. A photo ID that shows their name and correct address, including:
  2. Valid Arizona driver license
  3. Valid Arizona non-operating identification license
  4. Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
  5. Valid United States federal, state, or local government-issued identification

  6. Instead of showing a photo ID, the voter can show two of the following forms of non-photo ID that show their name and correct address:

  7. Utility bill of the voter that is dated within 90 days of the date of the election. A utility bill may be for electric, gas, water, solid waste, sewer, telephone, cellular phone, or cable television
  8. Bank or credit union statement that indicated within 90 days of the date of the election
  9. Valid Arizona Vehicle Registration
  10. Indian census card
  11. Property tax statement of the voter's residence
  12. Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
  13. Arizona vehicle insurance card
  14. Recorder's Certificate
  15. Valid United States federal, state, or local government-issued identification, including a voter registration card issued by the County Recorder
  16. Any mailing to the voter marked "Official Election Material"

  17. Alternatively, a voter can show one form of photo ID without a correct address and one form of non-photo ID that shows the correct address. The could be a passport or military ID along with an item from list two, or a photo ID from list 1 without a valid address along with an item from list 2.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

A.R.S. § 16-579(A) [link]

Is a student ID an acceptable form of identification?

No

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-579(A) [link]

Does the address on the ID have to match the address at which the voter is registered?

Yes

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-579(A)(1) [link]

If a voter has no ID, are there alternatives such as an oath or witness?

No. A voter can vote a provisional ballot. However, a provisional ballot may not count unless the voter brings the ID to the county board within a designated time period.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-579 [link]

Do elections without federal offices on the ballot (such as off-year gubernatorial elections) have different ID requirements?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 121.01 [link]

[link]

Voting in This Election [link]

Challenges to Voters at the Polling Place

Who can challenge a voter at the polling place?

Any qualified voter in the county, including a poll worker.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-591 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-590 [link]

What are the allowed reasons on which a voter can be challenged at the polling place?

(1) the voter is not qualified to vote or (2) the voter has already voted in that election

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-591 [link]

Is there a requirement for the challenger to provide cause or evidence?

No. However, challengers must provide a statement of grounds for the challenge in writing.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-591 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-121.01 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1552(D) [link]

How does a voter defend their eligibility to vote if they are challenged?

If a voter is challenged for their early ballot, within 24 hours of receiving the challenge, the election board, or other officer, will notify the voter of the challenge by mail. The notice will also include a time and place where the voter may defend the challenge. The board will allow the voter who has been challenged to make, or submit, a brief statement aboutthe challenge.

The burden to prove the challenge rests on the challenger. A person who has been challenged does not have to prove anything. If the challenged voter does not submit anything in writing or speak before the board, it is not assumed to be an admission.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-552 [link]

What are the restrictions on polling place challenges?

Challenges are permitted at the polling place on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-591 [link]

State and Local Election Officials

The State Election Authority

Who/what is the state election authority?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-142 [link]

Current official

Michele Reagan

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

About the Secretary [link]

E-mail

Use the "contact us" web form.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Contact [link]

Phone

Election Services can be reached at (602) 542-8683

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Contact Us [link]

Address

Capitol Executive Tower, 7th Floor
1700 West Washington Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007-2888

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Contact Us [link]

Local Election Authorities

What local election official(s) are in charge of major state-level elections (such as the even-year November general elections)?

The County Board of Supervisors and County Recorder. The duties are split up in some counties and consolidated by agreement in others.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 11-461(A) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-550 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 11-211 [link]

What is the county-level election official?

The County Board of Supervisors and County Recorder. The duties are split up in some counties and consolidated by agreement in others.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 11-461(A) [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-550 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 11-211 [link]

What is the municipal-level election official?

City or town clerk

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-503 [link]

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-509 [link]

Contact information for local election authorities

Click [here] (http://www.azsos.gov/elections/voting-election/contact-information-county-election-officials) for contact information for county election officials

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Contact Information for County Election Officials [link]

The Voter File

Voter File Basics

National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) Disclosure Law

Section 8 of the federal NVRA requires that each State maintain for at least 2 years and make available for public inspection and, where available, photocopying at a reasonable cost, all records concerning the implementation of programs and activities conducted for the purpose of ensuring the accuracy and currency of official lists of eligible voters, except to the extent that such records contain information about a person declining to register to vote or information about the identity of a voter registration agency through which a particular voter might have chosen to register.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

52 U.S.C. § 20507 [link]

Acquiring a Voter File

Under state procedure, who may acquire a voter file?

Any person.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168(D) [link]

Who is the state-level contact for acquiring a voter file?

County recorder

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168 [link]

How much does the state charge for the file?

The county recorder provides free precinct registers to state and county chairmen. Any other person can request to receive a copy of the precinct register for a fee of 5 cents per name, plus the cost of the blank disk or software furnished by the county recorder

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168(D) [link]

What format is the file available in?

The file is available in print or in electronic media such as a blank disk.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168(A) & (D) [link]

Use of the Voter File

Does the state have restrictions on commercial use of the voter file?

Precinct registers and other lists and information derived from voter registration applications may be used only for purposes relating to a political or political party activity, a political campaign or an election, for revising election district boundaries or for any other purpose specifically authorized by law and may not be used for a commercial purpose

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168 (F) [link]

Does the state have restrictions on non-commercial use of the voter file?

A person in possession of information derived from voter registration application or precinct registers shall not distribute, post or otherwise provide access to any portion of that information through the internet

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-06)

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-168(F) [link]