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Election Administration in Louisiana

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Election Types and Dates

Election Dates

Upcoming Primary Elections

The presidential preference primary and municipal primary is March 5, 2016.

The municipal general election is April 9, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-04)

Louisiana 2016 Elections [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:402 [link]

Upcoming General Elections

The general election for President and Congress is November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

Louisiana 2016 Elections [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:402 [link]

How is a nominee determined?

How is a nominee determined (caucus, primary, convention)?

Except for presidential primaries, Louisiana uses jungle primaries, in which all candidates, regardless of party affiliation, appear on the same primary ballot and voters may cast votes for any candidate regardless of the voter's or candidate's party affiliation.

In a single-winner election, like elections for Governor or a member of Congress, if a candidate in the primary earns more a majority of the vote (greater than 50%), that candidate is considered elected and no general election is held for that office. If no candidate in the primary earns a majority of the vote, then the two candidates who earned the most votes will run against each other in the general election.

For at-large or multi-winner races where voters cast multiple votes and multiple candidates must win, similar principles apply, but a majority is not defined as greater than 50%, but instead is defined as greater than the number reached by this equation: the total number of votes cast in the race divided by the number of seats to be filled, which is then divided by 2. If a candidate earns this many votes in the primary, the candidate is considered elected, and that candidate does not run again in a general election. However, if fewer candidates than there are seats earn this many votes in the primary, then the highest vote-earning candidates who did not earn this many votes will run against each other in the general election. The number of candidates who advance to the general election is twice the number of seats that remain open.

Presidential candidate nominees are chosen through traditional party primaries.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

How Are Candidates Elected? [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:401 (jungle primaries and exception for presidential primaries) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:511 (jungle primary rules) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:481 (advancing to general election) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:482 (number of candidates advancing to general election) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1280.21 (conduct of presidential primaries) [link]

Political Party Affiliation

Can voters register by party in the state?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:104 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:107 [link]

Must voters be registered with a political party if they would like to vote on that party’s candidates in a partisan primary election (i.e., are primaries open or closed)?

Open jungle primary, in which all candidates, regardless of party affiliation, appear on the same primary ballot and voters may cast votes for any candidate regardless of the voter's or candidate's party affiliation.

An exception applies to presidential primaries, which are not jungle primaries, but are traditional primaries that are closed by default. However, the state central committee of a political party may choose to open its presidential primaries to voters that are not affiliated with a political party.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:401 (jungle primaries and exception for presidential primaries) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1280.21 (conduct of presidential primaries) [link]

When can a voter change or switch their party affiliation?

Any time before the voter registration deadline for an election.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:135(C.) [link]

Voter Registration

Who Can Vote?

What are the state's residency requirements for voters?

A person must live in Lousiana and in the parish, municipality (if any, and precinct where) that person wishes to register to vote. To be considered a Lousiana resident, a person must intend to return to indefinitely to their home.

A homeless person may use a shelter as the person’s address for the purpose of registering to vote, so long as the person intends to live there indefinitely.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:101(B) [link]

La. Atty. Gen. Opinion 95-431 [link]

Can someone pre-register to vote if they will not be 18 years old by the next election? If so, who?

16- and 17-year-olds may pre-register to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:101(A.) [link]

Can 17-year-olds who will be 18-year-olds by the general election vote in the primary?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:101(A.) [link]

Does the state take away the right to vote from persons convicted of certain crimes? If so, what crimes?

Yes. Persons who are convicted of a felony and are under an order of imprisonment' are not eligible to vote. An order of imprisonment means a sentence of confinement, regardless of whether that sentence has been suspended or whether the person has been put on probation or parol.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:102 (ineligibility) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:2(8) (order of imprisonment) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:176 (suspension of registration) [link]

If people lose the right to vote because of a criminal conviction, can they regain the right to vote? How?

A person regains the right the vote after completing their sentence by going in person to the office of the registrar and providing documentation from the appropriate correction official showing that such person is no longer under an order of imprisonment. If the person has been deemed eligible for the Special Program for Handicapped Voters by the parish board of election supervisors, or the person has a disability and has submitted a statement from a physician stating that the person cannot vote in person, the person may send the documentation to the registrar by mail or fax instead of delivering it to the office in person.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:177 [link]

Voter Registration Options

Is fully online voter registration available? (i.e., can voters fill in and submit an online application without printing and signing it?)

Yes, for voters who have a Louisiana driver's license or Louisiana special ID card. Voters who have neither of these documents may fill out the registration form online, but they then must print the completed form and mail it to voter's parish registrar of voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

Louisiana Online Voter Registration [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:115.1 [link]

Does the state accept the National Mail Registration Form?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

http://www.eac.gov/voter_resources/register_to_vote.aspx [link]

Is the state required to register voters at public assistance agencies and driver's license agencies, per the National Voter Registration Act of 1993?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

http://www.justice.gov/crt/about/vot/nvra/activ_nvra.php [link]

Student-Specific Rules

Does the state have specific rules on students registering to vote or voting?

Students may use their home address within the state or their school address for voter registration purposes. Out-of-state students are allowed to use their school address in Louisiana if they want to be a voter in Louisiana.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:101 [link]

Voter Registration Deadlines

When is the voter registration deadline?

30 days before an election (unless that day is a legal holiday, in which case the following business day is the deadline).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:135 [link]

How is the deadline enforced for mailed applications?

The application must be postmarked by the registration deadline. If no postmark is legible or if the application is returned by a third party, then the application must be received by the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:115(E.) [link]

How is the deadline enforced for online applications?

The application must be reviewed by the Secretary of State and electronically forwarded to the parish registrar by the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:115.1(D.) [link]

When must a voter make changes to their registration for the changes to be in effect before the person seeks to vote?

All changes must be made by the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:135(C.) [link]

Voter Registration Drives

Does the state require organizations conducting voter registration drives to register?

No. The Secretary of State must provide for the voluntary registration of persons or entities that conduct voter registration drives in Louisiana. Mail voter registration applications must be available for organized voter registration programs. The Secretary of State’s website also has a “registration drive application” for ordering voter registration applications, which is available at here.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:18(A)(9) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:115(D) [link]

Are there restrictions on getting voter registration forms?

Louisiana law does not address restrictions on getting forms. Voter registration applications may be obtained in bulk by completing the contact form on the Secretary of State’s webpage. Requesters are asked to provide a physical address and indicate the number of applications needed.

The Secretary of State’s Voter Registration Best Practices document also indicates that the local parish Registrar of can provide paper applications for use.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Secretary of State's website [link]

La. Sec’y of State, Voter Registration Drive Best Practices [link]

Does the state require any training in order to conduct voter registration drives?

No.

Does the state have restrictions on who may help others register to vote?

No. However, no person may procure or submit voter registration applications that are known to the person to be materially false, fictitious or fraudulent. This offense is punishable by a fine up to $2000 and/or imprisonment up to two years for a first offense, and by a fine up to $5000 and/or five years of imprisonment for a subsequent offense.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1461.2(A)(5), (B) [link]

Does the state have restrictions on paying drive workers, or additional rules related to payment?

Louisiana law does not address this issue.

Are there restrictions on the voter registration drive offering something of value to a person in exchange for completing a voter registration application?

Louisiana prohibits bribery of voters, which includes giving or offering to give, directly or indirectly, any money or anything of apparent present or prospective value to secure or influence registration of a person. This offense is punishable with a fine up to $4000 and/or imprisonment for up to two years, for a first offense, with subsequent offenses punishable with a fine of up to $10,000 and/or imprisonment for up to five years.

Additionally, federal law states that whoever "pays or offers to pay or accepts payment either for registration to vote or for voting shall be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than five years." At least one federal appellate court has interpreted "payment" as "intended to include forms of pecuniary value offered or given directly to an individual voter, and indicated the value should be based on "an assessment of the monetary worth of an item from the perspective of the voter receiving the item." That case held that food vouchers could be "payment."

Another example is California's Secretary of State's interpretation of the federal law to mean that "Any type of incentive is considered 'payment,' even things as seemingly innocent as cookies or admission to an entertainment event."

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1461 [link]

52 U.S.C. § 10307(c) [link]

United States v. Garcia, 719 F.2d 99, 102-103 (5th Cir. 1983) [link]

California Secretary of State's Guide to Voter Registration Drives, p. 11 [link]

Must the registration drive worker sign the completed voter registration application, and must the drive or canvasser place other information on applications?

No.

Does the state have a rule requiring a receipt or other tracking information to be provided to the applicant?

No.

Are there restrictions on copying completed voter registration applications prior to submitting them to the election official, or other restrictions on data entry or disclosure?

Yes. The Secretary of State’s “Best Practices for Voter Registration Drives” indicates, “[i]t is a crime to copy voter registration applications and the information they contain for any reason” and indicate that the criminal penalty for a first offense violation is $2,000 or 2 years in jail, or both.

Louisiana law provides that no person may knowingly, willfully, or intentionally copy or reproduce a voter registration application that has been submitted by an applicant for purposes other than fulfilling the person's duties relative to registration of voters as provided by law. This offense is punishable by a fine up to $2000 and/or imprisonment up to two years for a first offense, and by a fine up to $5000 and/or five years of imprisonment for a subsequent offense.

In addition, any person who handles the voter registration application form of another person is prohibited from circulating on a commercial list or otherwise disclosing the following:

  • The fact that a registered voter is entitled to assistance in voting.
  • The social security number of a registered voter.
  • The driver's license number of a registered voter.
  • The day and month of the date of birth of a registered voter.
  • The mother's maiden name of a registered voter.
  • The electronic mail address of a registered voter.
  • The short message service number of a registered voter.
Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Sec’y of State, Voter Registration Drive Best Practices [link]

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1461.2(A)(9), (B) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:154 (C), (I) [link]

Is there a time limit for voter registration groups to submit the voter registration applications they collect?

Yes. An application collected through a voter registration drive must be submitted to the applicable parish registrar of voters’ office within 30 days of receipt of the completed application from the applicant.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1461.7(A)(1) [link]

What are the consequences for failing to submit applications on time?

Knowing, willful, or intentional failure to submit the completed applications within the time limit is punishable by a maximum fine of $1,000 and/or one year in jail. For subsequent offenses the penalty increases to a maximum of $2,500 and/or five years in jail.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-03-22)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1461.7(B) [link]

Same-Day Registration

Can voters register and vote on the same day (i.e., does the state offer same-day registration)?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:135 [link]

Voters Who Have Moved or Changed Their Name

Can people vote if they moved, but did not update their voter registration with their new address?

A voter who moves to a new address within the same parish may vote in the precinct where they used to live until they update their registration with their new address. A voter who moves to a new address in a different parish may vote in the precinct where they used to live until they register in the parish they moved to or until three months after they moved, whichever comes first.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-29)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:521(C.) [link]

Can people vote if they have changed their name, but did not update their voter registration with their new name?

Voters who have not updated their voter registration record before the voter registration deadline may vote using their old name.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:135 [link]

Interview with Secretary of State's Office [link]

Language, Literacy, and Disability Access

Language and Literacy Access

Does the state have any places that must provide election materials in languages other than English, per Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

http://www.justice.gov/sites/default/files/crt/legacy/2011/10/13/2011_notice.pdf [link]

Does the state have any other rules about providing election materials in languages other than English?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:106(D.) [link]

Who can help a voter with reading assistance or translation if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, any voter who needs help when voting because of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may be helped by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under state law, a voter who is unable to read may receive assistance from any person of the voter's choice at the polls or during early voting, including election commissioners at the polls and a registrar or deputy registrar during early voting, except the voter can't be helped by the voter's employer or an agent of that employer, an agent of the voter's union, a candidate, or the commissioner-in-charge at the polling place. The assistant must sign the precinct register.

Additionally, if a voter who cannot read does not present proper ID when voting and chooses to complete an affidavit, the voter's assistant may help the voter complete the affidavit. If the precinct or early voting location is equipped with a voting machine that provides an audio ballot, a voter who is unable to read may use that to cast their vote and, in addition to receiving assistance from their assistant, will receive assistance using the equipment from an election commissioner.

A voter receiving literacy assistance or using an audio ballot has 20 minutes in the voting booth to complete their ballot, instead of the usual 3 minutes.

If a voter who is unable to read or write votes an absentee ballot, the voter may receive assistance from any person of the voter's choosing except a candidate. The assistant may help the voter complete the absentee ballot and help the voter sign or make their mark on the absentee ballot envelope. The assistant must also personally sign the envelope in the appropriate area.

Additionally, a person who requires assistance in completing a voter registration application due to being unable to read or write English may notify the registrar, without any formality, and receive assistance from any person authorized to receive voter registration applications and, if needed, an interpreter.

A voter's assistant may not attempt to influence how the voter voters or reveal how the voter voted.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:564 (polling place) [link]

Disability Access

Who can help a voter with a disability if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965, any voter who needs help when voting because of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may be helped by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under state law, for a voter who has a disability to receive assistance voting on Election Day, during early voting, or through an absentee ballot, the voter must submit to the registrar either in person or by mail, or to the election commissioner-in-charge at the precinct on Election Day, a statement explaining the reasons the voter needs assistance. The voter must also submit with this statement one of the following documents: (1) a certificate of a medical doctor or optometrist certifying to the irremediable nature of the physical disability; (2) a copy of a current mobility impairment identification card that has a photo of the voter and the international symbol of accessibility issued by the secretary of the Department of Public Safety and Corrections; or (3) a copy of current documentation showing eligibility for social security disability benefits, veteran's disability benefits, paratransit services, benefits from the office for citizens with developmental disabilities, or benefits from Louisiana Rehabilitation Services. Additionally, if the voter submits this information before Election Day by mail, the voter must submit a copy of one of the following forms of ID: a Louisiana driver's license, a Louisiana special identification card, or another generally recognized photo ID card that contains the name and signature of the voter. Once a voter submits these documents, the voter will not need to submit any further documentation in any future election.

A voter who has a disability may receive assistance from any person of the voter's choice at the polls or during early voting, including election commissioners at the polls and a registrar or deputy registrar during early voting, except from the voter's employer or an agent of that employer, an agent of the voter's union, a candidate, or the commissioner-in-charge at the polling place. The assistant must sign the precinct register. Additionally, if a voter who has a disability does not present proper ID when voting and chooses to complete an affidavit, the voter's assistant may help the voter complete the affidavit. If the precinct or early voting location is equipped with a voting machine that provides an audio ballot, a voter who has a visual impairment may use that to cast their vote and, in addition to receiving assistance from their assistant, will receive assistance using the equipment from an election commissioner.

If a voter who has a disability votes an absentee ballot, the voter may receive assistance from any person of the voter's choosing except for a candidate. The assistant may help the voter complete the absentee ballot and help the voter sign or make their mark on the absentee ballot envelope. An assistant must also personally sign the envelope in the appropriate area.

Different rules apply to voters with disabilities who live in a nursing home or veteran's home and wish to vote an absentee ballot. Such voters may apply for an absentee ballot by sending, by mail or in person, a letter to the registrar at least 30 days before an election asking for an absentee ballot. The letter must include the voter's name, the address of the nursing or veteran's home, and the voter's signature or the voter's mark signed by one witness. The letter must be accompanied by a physician's statement providing proof of the disability and certifying the voter cannot vote in person because of it, except this statement is not necessary if the voter was approved by a parish board of election supervisors as eligible for the Special Program for Handicapped Voters before January 1, 2010. The registrar will then send the voter a letter saying when a deputy registrar or another person appointed by the registrar will travel to the nursing or veteran's home to give that person an absentee ballot and then collect it after the voter completes the ballot. Such voters may be assisted by anyone except a candidate, an employee of the nursing or veteran's home, or an agent of the voter's employer or union. No one other than a blood relative, spouse, or registrar may assist multiple voters in the home. Voters who apply for absentee ballots this way do not need to send letters or documentation in future elections so long as they remain in a nursing or veteran's home in the parish.

A voter's assistant may not attempt to influence how the voter voters or reveal how the voter voted.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:564 (polling place) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309.3 (early voting) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:562 (polling place affidavit) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309 (early voting affidavit) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1310 (absentee ballot) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1303(F.) & (I.) (absentee ballot) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:115(F.)(2)(absentee ballot) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1461.4 (influencing voter) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1461.7(A.)(2) (revealing vote [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1333 (nursing and veteran's homes) [link]

Does the state have other rules related to access for persons with disabilities?

A voter who is receiving disability assistance or using an audio ballot has 20 minutes in the voting booth to mark their ballot, instead of the usual 3 minutes.

At a precinct or early voting location, a voter who has a visible physical disability, or who presents a current mobility impairment identification card bearing a photograph of the voter and the international symbol of accessibility issued by the secretary of the Department of Public Safety and Corrections, is allowed to go to the front of the line to cast a ballot along with the voter's assistant.

If a voter's polling place is inaccessible due to the voter's physical disability, the voter may seek permission from the registrar to vote at the polling place nearest the precinct that is accessible to the voter, if the polling place is within the same congressional, senatorial, representative, school board, police jury, councilmanic and all other districts as the precinct at which the voter is registered. To obtain permission, the voter must submit satisfactory evidence of their disability to the registrar at least 10 days before the election. If the registrar decides that, due to the physical disability, the voter is unable to vote at the precinct, the registrar must issue to the voter special authorization to vote at another specific precinct. The voter must then show this authorization to the commissioners at the polling place. The authorization will remain in effect for future elections.

A person who requires assistance completing a voter registration application due to a physical disability may notify the registrar, without any formality, and receive assistance from any person authorized to receive voter registration applications.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:563 (20 minutes) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:564 (polling place) [link]

Early Voting, Absentee Voting, and Other Ways to Vote

Early Voting/Absentee In-Person Voting

Does the state have early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Yes. All voters may vote early.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1303(A.) [link]

Where does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

Each parish registrar's office is an early voting location, unless the registrar's office is not suitable for early voting, in which event the registrar may designate a public building close to the office as an alternative early location. In addition to the registrar's office or alternative location, a registrar may designate one additional public building in the parish as an early voting location, or two additional public buildings as early voting locations if the parish extends for more than 50 miles and is interspersed with navigable waters. Additionally, the Secretary of State may designate additional early voting locations in a parish.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309.2 [link]

When does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

From 14 days to 7 days before any scheduled election, early voting locations selected by the registrar will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. A register, with the approval of the Secretary of State, may set different days and times to open early voting locations that are selected by the Secretary of State. Persons in line to vote at when an early voting location closes must be allowed to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309(A) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309.2 [link]

What official chooses early voting/absentee in-person voting locations?

Parish registrars, but the Secretary of State may also select additional locations for early voting if the Secretary's choices are approved by the House Committee on House & Governmental Affairs and the Senate Committee on Senate & Governmental Affairs.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1309.2 [link]

Are lists of early voters/absentee in-person voters published? How?

Yes, a list is publicly posted at the registrar's office.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-30)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1311 [link]

Absentee Voting by Mail

Can anyone vote absentee by mail without an excuse? If not, what excuses allow a voter to vote absentee by mail?

No. Only voters who fall into one of the following categories, and expect to be out of the parish on Election Day, may vote absentee by mail. Different rules apply to first-time voters who registered to vote by mail (see First Time voters question below).

  • A voter with a disability
  • A person living outside the United States
  • A member, or the spouse or dependent of a member, of the United States Service, including a member of the armed forces of the U.S. while in active service, a member of the merchant marine, a civil employee of the U.S. while outside the country, or a member of a religious group or welfare agency attached to and serving with members of the armed services;
  • A student, instructor, or professor in a college located outside their parish of registration for educational purposes, and that person's spouse or dependents if they live with this person
  • A person who is or expects to be temporarily outside of their parish of registration during the early voting period and on Election Day
  • A voter who expects to be out of their precinct of registration and sailing upon the waters of the state both during the early voting period and on Election Day because of their employment or occupation
  • A minister, priest, rabbi, or other member of the clergy assigned to a religious post outside their parish of registration, and the spouse or dependents who live with this person
  • A person who, after the voter registration deadline, moved to another parish more than 100 miles from the parish where they used to live
  • A voter involuntarily confined in an institution for mental treatment outside the voter's parish of registration who has not been declared incompetent by a court
  • A voter who expects to be hospitalized on Election Day who did not have knowledge of their expected hospitalization until after the early voting period ends; or a voter who expects to be hospitalized on Election Day and was hospitalized during the time for early voting; or a voter who was hospitalized and released before Election Day, but was either hospitalized or restricted to their bed by their physician during early voting and is restricted to their bed by their physician on Election Day
  • A voter who lives at home and was approved for participation in the Special Program for Handicapped Voters before January 1, 2010
  • A voter who is imprisoned inside or outside their parish of registration and is not under an order of imprisonment for conviction of a felony
  • A person who is a program participant in the Department of State Address Confidentiality Program
  • A voter who is at least 65 years old
Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1303 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1302(8) [link]

Deadline to apply for absentee ballot by mail

Generally, voters must apply by 4:30 p.m. central time, four days before Election Day. Different rules apply to military and overseas voters (see section below on Military and Overseas voters), voters who are or expect to be in the hospital (see question below on emergencies), and disabled voters who live in a nursing or veteran's home (see Disability Access section above).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307(B)(2) [link]

How does a voter apply for an absentee mail ballot?

To request an absentee ballot, a voter should complete and return (by hand, mail or fax) a Request for Absentee Ballot by Mail form, or submit a letter that has the same information as the form. Some voters can also apply online (see question below).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

Application for Absentee by Mail Ballot [link]

La. Rev. Stat 18:1307(B.) [link]

Can a voter make an online request for an absentee mail ballot?

Voters who have a Louisiana driver's license or Louisiana special ID card, and military/overseas voters, can apply through the online Louisiana Voter Portal.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

Louisiana Voter Portal [link]

La. Rev. Stat 18:1307(B.) [link]

Does a voter need to submit any supporting documentation or verification with an absentee mail ballot or absentee mail ballot application? If so, what is required?

If a voter is requesting an absentee ballot because of a disability, and the voter was not approved before January 1, 2010 for the Special Program for Handicapped Voters, the voter must submit to the registrar one of the following: (1) a copy of current mobility impairment identification card bearing a photograph of the voter and the international symbol of accessibility issued by the secretary of the Department of Public Safety and Corrections; (2) a copy of current documentation showing eligibility for social security disability benefits, veteran's disability benefits, paratransit services, benefits from the office for citizens with developmental disabilities, or benefits from Louisiana Rehabilitation Services; or (3) current proof of disability from a physician. The voter must also include a copy of a Louisiana driver's license, Louisiana special ID card, other photo ID that has the voter's name and address, or a statement affirming the voter's identity signed by two registered voters in the parish and including their names and addresses.

A person who is hospitalized must submit documentation of their hospitalization from their physician or hospital.

For a person who is incarcerated but not under an order of imprisonment for committing a felony, the registrar must receive certification from the sheriff that the voter was not convicted of a felony.

A person who is a sequestered juror must submit a certified copy of the court order.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1303(I) & (G) (disabilities and prisoners) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307(D) (hospital) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307.1 (jurors) [link]

Are there restrictions on who may request or turn in an absentee mail ballot application for a voter?

No, except that no person, except the immediate family of any voter, may hand deliver more than one voter's absentee ballot application to the registrar of voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307(B) [link]

Deadline to return absentee ballots

In most circumstances, the ballot must be received (either by mail, fax, or hand delivery) by 4:30pm the day before the election. For sequestered jurors and hospitalized persons, the ballot must be received by the time the polls close on Election Day. Different rules apply to military/overseas voters (see section below on Military and Overseas Voting)

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1308(B) & (C) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1308.1(C) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1311(D) [link]

Are there restrictions on who may return a voter's absentee mail ballot for them?

No, except that a person other than the voter who hand delivers the ballot to the registrar's office must sign a statement saying they have the voter's consent to deliver the ballot. No person except the immediate family of the voter may hand deliver more than one marked ballot to the registrar.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1308(B) [link]

First-time voters

First time voters who register by mail or online cannot vote absentee by mail, unless they fall into one of the following exceptions:

  • A person who goes to the registrar's office before early voting starts and establishes their identity by showing the registrar a Louisiana driver's license, birth certificate, or other document that establishes identity
  • A college student located outside of the parish where registered, if the student submits a copy of a student ID or a fee bill showing current enrollment with the application to vote by mail
  • A person who has a disability, if they submit proof of their disability from a physician and a physician's certification that the person cannot vote in person, along with a copy of the person's Louisiana driver's license, Louisiana special ID card, other photo ID that has the person's name and address, or a statement affirming the person's identity signed by two registered voters in the parish and includes their names and addresses
  • Military and overseas voters
  • A person who was approved for the Special Program for Handicapped Voters before January 1, 2010
  • A voter who is otherwise entitled to vote under the Voting Accessibility for the Elderly and Handicapped Act
  • A participant in the Louisiana Department of State Address Confidentiality Program
Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:115(F.) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:115.1(F.) [link]

Are there any special emergency rules that allow a voter to vote absentee by mail if they are unable to make it to the polls at the last minute?

Yes, a voter who qualifies for an absentee ballot for being hospitalized has until 4:30 p.m. on the day before the election to submit an absentee ballot application, which must be accompanied by documentation of the hospitalization from the physician or hospital.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307(D) [link]

Are lists of people who vote absentee by mail published? How?

Yes. It is posted publicly at the registrar's office.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1311 [link]

Presidential-only ballots

Under federal law, any registered voter who moves out of the state after the 30th day before a Presidential election may vote for President and Vice President either in person at the voter's previous state of residence or using an absentee ballot from the voter's previous state of residence.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

52 U.S.C. § 10502(e) [link]

Absentee Voting for Military and Overseas Voters

Who is eligible for military/overseas absentee voting?

The following people are eligible:

  • A person living outside the United States
  • A member, or the spouse or dependent of a member, of the United States Service, including a member of the armed forces of the U.S. while in active service, a member of the merchant marine, a civil employee of the U.S. while outside the country, or a member of a religious group or welfare agency attached to and serving with members of the armed services
Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1302(8) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307(C) [link]

How do voters apply for a military/overseas ballot?

Overseas and military voters may apply for an absentee ballot using the federal post-card application, by mailing or faxing an Application for Absentee Ballot for Military and Overseas Voters Only, or online through the Louisiana Voter Portal.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-01)

Application for Absentee Ballot for Military and Overseas Voters Only [link]

Louisiana Voter Portal [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307(C) [link]

Deadline to apply for a military/overseas ballot

By 4:30 p.m. Central time the day before the election.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1307(C) [link]

Deadline to return the military/overseas ballot

The ballot must be received on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1308(C) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1311 [link]

Who is eligible to use a write-in absentee ballot? How does it work?

Military and overseas voters may use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB) if they have applied (on time) for an absentee ballot and did not yet receive it.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1319 [link]

On Election Day

Where do you vote in person?

Where do you vote in person?

At the polling place in the precinct where the voter is registered to vote, unless the polling place is inaccessible due to the voter's physical disability (see Disability Access section above for more information).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:531 [link]

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

7:00am - 8:00pm, except that in congressional primary elections and elections held at the same time as congressional elections, the polls are open from 6:00 am to 8:00pm. A voter has 3 minutes in the voting booth to cast a ballot, unless the voter is receiving literacy or disability assistance or using an audio ballot, in which case the voter has 20 minutes in the voting booth to cast a ballot. Voters in line at 8:00pm must be allowed to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La Rev. Stat. 18:541 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:563 [link]

Informational Pamphlet for Election Day Voting, p. 44 [link]

In the Voting Booth

Are there rules about what materials a voter can and cannot bring into the voting booth?

A voter may not bring campaign materials into the voting both or 600 feet of it. A voter can bring in a sample ballot that is marked with the voter's candidate preferences.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1462 (campaign materials) [link]

Op. Atty. Gen., 1920-22, p. 551 (sample ballot) [link]

Can a voter bring children into the voting booth with them?

A pre-teen child may accompany his parent or legal guardian to the voting machine.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:563(B) [link]

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

No, but an employer cannot fire an employee for the employee's political opinions or attempt to control how or whether the employee votes. Additionally, an employer who has at least 20 or more employees cannot coerce or influence employees to engage in any political activities.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. § 23:961 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. §23:962 [link]

Campaigning, Electioneering, and Recording Devices

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering during early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Any persons conducting the following activities must stay at least 600 feet from the entrance to the early voting location: (1) soliciting any person to vote for or against any candidate or proposition; (2) handing out, placing, or displaying campaign cards, pictures, or other campaign literature; or (3) placing or displaying political signs, pictures, or other forms of political advertising.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1462(A) [link]

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering on Election Day?

Any persons conducting the following activities must stay at least 600 feet from the entrance to the polling place: (1) soliciting any person to vote for or against any candidate or proposition; (2) remaining within such polling place or within a radius of 600 feet of the entrance of such polling place, except when exercising the right to vote, after having been directed, in writing, by an election commissioner or law enforcement officer to leave the premises or area of a polling place; (3) handing out, placing or displaying campaign cards, pictures, or other campaign literature; or (4) placing or displaying political signs, pictures, or other forms of political advertising.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1462(A) [link]

Can a voter wear a button or t-shirt with a candidate's name or logo on it into the polling place when they vote?

No, displaying campaign materials in the polling place is prohibited.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1462(A) [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

There is no specific restriction in state law against taking pictures, but the law does state that a person cannot knowingly, willfully, or intentionally allow a ballot to be seen or announce the manner in which a person has cast his ballot

Source (confirmed on: 10/14/2016)

LSA-R.S. 18:1461.7 [link]

*NEW 2** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) outside the polling place but within the zone around the polling place where campaigning/electioneering is banned?

State law does not address this issue. Local practices may vary.

Who's at the Polls?

Can persons other than election workers observe inside the polls?

Yes. Each candidate can appoint one watcher (and one alternate) to every precinct where the candidate's office is on the ballot. A candidate can also appoint one super watcher who can serve as a watcher in every precinct where the candidate's office is on the ballot. Additionally, any person or legal entity that has filed reports required by the Campaign Finance Disclosure Act and supports or opposes a ballot proposition or the recall of a public officer can appoint one watcher (and one alternate) to every precinct in which the ballot proposition or recall is on the ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:435 [link]

What are observers inside the polls called in the state?

Watchers.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:435 [link]

Does the state establish requirements to observe inside the polls?

Yes, watchers can be appointed only be candidates or legal entities supporting or opposing a ballot proposition or recall election that have filed reports under the Campaign Finance Disclosure Act. Candidates and legal entities must submit lists of watchers and the precinct where each watcher will serve by 4:30pm the 10th day before the election (or the next business day if the 10th day is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday). A candidate's list must be signed by the candidate and, if submitted by someone other than the candidate, must be accompanied by a letter of authorization from the candidate. Legal entities other than political parties must submit with the list a certified statement that it has submitted the report required by the Campaign Finance Disclosure Act.

Watchers must be qualified voters in Louisiana and cannot be candidates, law enforcement officers, or eligible for literacy or disability assistance. A watcher cannot also serve as an election commissioner. An alternative election commissioner can be appointed as a watcher, but if this person is called upon to actually replace an absent or unqualified commissioner, the person can no longer serve as a watcher.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:427 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:435 [link]

Informational Pamphlet for Election Day Voting, p. 43 [link]

*NEW 3* Can a poll observer use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) in the polling place?

Video recording is permitted. Otherwise, state law does not address this issue and local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 10/9/2016)

LSA-R.S. 18:427 [link]

Are there other rules on what poll observers can or cannot do?

A watcher can observe voting and vote counting, notify election commissioners of any violation of the law, and take notes on the conduct of the election. The watcher cannot campaign, talk about politics, unnecessarily delay a voter, or interfere with the work of election commissioners.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:427 [link]

Provisional Voting and Voters at the Wrong Polling Place

When should a voter be offered a provisional ballot?

Under Section 203 of the federal Help America Vote Act of 2002, if a person claims to be a registered voter in the jurisdiction in which the person desires to vote and the person claims to be eligible to vote in a federal election, but the person’s name does not appear on the official list of eligible voters for the polling place or an election official asserts that the person is not eligible to vote, then that person must be allowed to cast a provisional ballot at that polling place. The person may cast the provisional ballot after executingfilling out/completing, beforein front of an election official at the polling place, a written affirmation stating that the person is (1) a registered voter in the jurisdiction, and (2) eligible to vote in that election.

Additionally, any person who votes in a federal election as a result of a federal or state court order, or any other order extending the time established for closing the polls by a state law in effect 10 days before the date of that election, may only vote in that election by casting a provisional ballot. Any such ballot cast must be separated and held apart from other provisional ballots cast for different reasons.

Under Louisiana law, provisional ballots should be offered to voters in a federal election (1) whose name does not appear on the precinct register and who the register has not granted the right to vote by affidavit, or (2) who the commissioners assert are not eligible to vote and who have declared themselves to be registered and eligible voters, or (3) who are voting in a federal election during court-ordered extended polling hours.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

52 U.S.C. § 21082 (federal law) [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:566 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:566.1 [link]

If a voter casts a provisional ballot at the wrong precinct, will the ballot be counted?

If the voter casts a provisional ballot in the wrong precinct, but the precinct is in the parish where the voter is registered to vote, the ballot will be counted for federal elections. If the voter casts a provisional ballot in the wrong precinct and the precinct is in a parish where the voter is not registered the vote, the provisional ballot will not be counted.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:566 [link]

http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/Vote/VoteProvisionally/Pages/default.aspx [link]

Finding out if a provisional ballot was counted

After at least 7 days after the election, voters may use Louisiana's online Provisional Voter Search tool to learn whether their provisional ballots were counted, or a voter may call 800-883-2805. When calling, a voter should have available the provisional ballot number provided at the polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

Provisional Voter Search [link]

http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/Vote/VoteProvisionally/Pages/default.aspx [link]

Ballot Shortages/Voting Machine Malfunctions

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a voting machine breaks or malfunctions?

Paper ballots may be used only during the time when a precinct does not have a voting machine that is operable and the secretary of state, or designee, has declared an emergency in writing for implementation of emergency election day paper ballot voting procedures.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:1352(B) [link]

31 La. Admin. Code Pt I, 1105(B) [link]

Voter ID and Challenges

Voter ID

Who must show ID to vote?

All voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:562(A)(2) [link]

What ID is acceptable?

A photo identification card, which may include a Louisiana driver's license, a Louisiana Special ID card, or other generally recognized picture identification card with the voter's name and signature.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:562(A)(2) [link]

Is a student ID an acceptable form of identification?

Yes, if it has the voter's name, photo and signature.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:562(A)(2) [link]

Does the address on the ID have to match the address at which the voter is registered?

No; the ID does not need to contain the voter's address at all.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:562(A)(2) [link]

If a voter has no ID, are there alternatives such as an oath or witness?

If the voter does not have a photo ID, the voter may still vote if they sign a voter identification affidavit which includes the voter's name, address, date of birth, and mother's maiden name (unless unknown). These voters may have their right to vote challenged (see section below on Voter Challenges.)

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:562(A)(2) [link]

Informational Pamphlet for Election Day Voting, pp. 25-26 [link]

Do elections without federal offices on the ballot (such as off-year gubernatorial elections) have different ID requirements?

No. Voter identification requirements are the same in every election for all voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:562(A)(2) [link]

Challenges to Voters at the Polling Place

Who can challenge a voter at the polling place?

A commissioner, watcher or qualified voter may challenge a voter.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:565(A) [link]

What are the allowed reasons on which a voter can be challenged at the polling place?

Three reasons: (1) the applicant is not qualified to vote in the election; or (2) the applicant is not qualified to vote in the precinct; or (3) the applicant is not the person whose name is on the precinct register, including challenges based on the voter signing an affidavit instead of presenting a photo ID.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:565(A) [link]

Is there a requirement for the challenger to provide cause or evidence?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:565 [link]

How does a voter defend their eligibility to vote if they are challenged?

If a challenge is made, the commissioners will determine whether the challenge is valid or invalid. If invalid, the voter may cast a ballot. If the commissioners determine by majority vote that the challenge is valid, the voter cannot cast a ballot. Exceptions apply if a valid challenge is based on the voter having moved inside the parish or having moved outside of the parish within the last three months. In these circumstances, the voter is allowed to vote after completing an address confirmation form.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:565 [link]

State and Local Election Officials

The State Election Authority

Who/what is the state election authority?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Const. art. IV, § 7 [link]

Current official

Tom Schedler

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

http://www.sos.la.gov/OurOffice/LearnAboutTomSchedler/Pages/default.aspx [link]

E-mail

See list of e-mail contact forms for the Elections Division at http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/ContactUs/Pages/default.aspx

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/ContactUs/Pages/default.aspx [link]

Phone

See list of phone numbers for the Elections Division at http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/ContactUs/Pages/default.aspx

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/ContactUs/Pages/default.aspx [link]

Address

Physical address:

8585 Archives Ave.
Baton Rouge, LA 70809

Mailing address:

P.O. Box 94125
Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9125

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

http://www.sos.la.gov/OurOffice/ContactUs/Pages/default.aspx [link]

Local Election Authorities

What local election official(s) are in charge of major state-level elections (such as the even-year November general elections)?

The parish's Clerk of the Court is the chief election officer for the parish, and the parish's Registrar of Voters oversees voter registration, early voting, and absentee voting.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:422 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:58 [link]

What is the county-level election official?

The parish's Clerk of the Court is the chief election officer for the parish, and the parish's Registrar of Voters oversees voter registration, early voting, and absentee voting.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:422 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:58 [link]

What is the municipal-level election official?

None.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

La. Rev. Stat. 18:422 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:58 [link]

Contact information for local election authorities

Registrar of Voters: https://voterportal.sos.la.gov/Registrar

    Clerk of Court: https://voterportal.sos.la.gov/ElectedOfficials
Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-02)

https://voterportal.sos.la.gov/Registrar [link]

https://voterportal.sos.la.gov/ElectedOfficials [link]

The Voter File

Voter File Basics

National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) Disclosure Law

Section 8 of the federal NVRA requires that each State maintain for at least 2 years and make available for public inspection and, where available, photocopying at a reasonable cost, all records concerning the implementation of programs and activities conducted for the purpose of ensuring the accuracy and currency of official lists of eligible voters, except to the extent that such records contain information about a person declining to register to vote or information about the identity of a voter registration agency through which a particular voter might have chosen to register.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-09-01)

52 U.S.C. § 20507 [link]

Acquiring a Voter File

Under state procedure, who may acquire a voter file?

Members of the general public.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

31 La. Admin. Code Pt II, 105 [link]

La. Rev. Stat. 18:154(A) [link]

Who is the state-level contact for acquiring a voter file?

The Secretary of State's Office. Persons can request a voter file using the online application at https://voterportal.sos.la.gov/CommercialRequests with questions should contact the Voter Registration division by 225-922-0900 or use the email form at http://www.sos.la.gov/Pages/ContactUs.aspx?recipient=Elections%20Division&subject=Elections%20Division%20Web%20Inquiry&returnto=/ElectionsAndVoting/BecomeACandidate/PurchaseVoterLists/Pages/default.aspx

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

Online Application [link]

Email Contact Form [link]

http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/GetElectionInformation/Pages/default.aspx [link]

How much does the state charge for the file?

The file costs $0.01 (that is, 1 cent) per voter in the file, except the cost cannot exceed $5000. If requesting only part of the file (information on 2000 voters or less), the minimum charge is $20. An additional $7.50 delivery charge applies if the list is delivered on a CD-ROM through the mail.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

31 La. Admin. Code Pt II, 105 [link]

http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/PublishedDocuments/VoterListChargesAndInfo.pdf [link]

What format is the file available in?

PDF format or tab delimited text (.txt) files. The records can be sent through the mail in a CD-ROM or through e-mail.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

31 La. Admin. Code Pt II, 105 [link]

http://www.sos.la.gov/ElectionsAndVoting/PublishedDocuments/RecordFormatSheet.pdf [link]

Use of the Voter File

Does the state have restrictions on commercial use of the voter file?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

Interview with Secretary of State's Office [link]

Does the state have restrictions on non-commercial use of the voter file?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-10-05)

Interview with Secretary of State's Office [link]