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Election Administration in New Hampshire

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Election Types and Dates

Election Dates

Upcoming Primary Elections

The primary election is September 13, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

New Hampshire 2016 Political Calendar [link]

Upcoming General Elections

The general election is November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

New Hampshire 2016 Political Calendar [link]

How is a nominee determined?

How is a nominee determined (caucus, primary, convention)?

Mostly primaries. However, a candidate may also have their name placed on the general election ballot by submitting the requisite number of nomination papers.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 652:5 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 655:81 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 655:40 655:40 [link]

Political Party Affiliation

Can voters register by party in the state?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:15 [link]

Must voters be registered with a political party if they would like to vote on that party’s candidates in a partisan primary election (i.e., are primaries open or closed)?

Primaries are partially closed; to vote a party's primary ballot, the voter must either be affiliated with that political party or not have declared a party affiliation. (The parties decide whether to allow undeclared voters to vote in their primary election, and in 2016, all parties have decided to allow undeclared voters to participate.)

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Sec. of State, FAQ: Voting in Primaries [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:14 [link]

When can a voter change or switch their party affiliation?

The only time party-affiliated voters cannot change their party affiliation is from the first Wednesday in June through the day of the primary election. However, undeclared voters can affiliate with a political party on the day of the primary election.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:34 [link]

Voter Registration

Who Can Vote?

Can someone pre-register to vote if they will not be 18 years old by the next election? If so, who?

No. A 17-year-old may register to vote if they will be 18 by the next election.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:7(I)(a) [link]

Can 17-year-olds who will be 18-year-olds by the general election vote in the primary?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:12(I) [link]

Does the state take away the right to vote from persons convicted of certain crimes? If so, what crimes?

The right to vote is lost upon conviction of a felony, except that a person may vote if the sentence is suspended (with or without probation) or during any period of parole.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:5 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 607-A:2 [link]

If people lose the right to vote because of a criminal conviction, can they regain the right to vote? How?

For most felony convictions, a person automatically regains their right after their sentence is completed, or as soon as the sentence is suspended or the person is put on parole. However, if a person is convicted of bribery or intimidation relating to elections, then the person can regain the right to vote only if the New Hampshire Supreme Court restores that person's right to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:6 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 607-A:2 [link]

Voter Registration Options

Is fully online voter registration available? (i.e., can voters fill in and submit an online application without printing and signing it?)

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Sec. of State, Voter Registration FAQ [link]

Does the state accept the National Mail Registration Form?

No. The National Mail Registration Form is only accepted as a request for an official New Hampshire Voter Registration application.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

National Mail Registration Form (English) [link]

Is the state required to register voters at public assistance agencies and driver's license agencies, per the National Voter Registration Act of 1993?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

U.S. Department of Justice website [link]

Student-Specific Rules

Does the state have specific rules on students registering to vote or voting?

A student may choose to register to vote either at the address where they live while attending school or at another address considered their home, such as their parent's address.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:1 [link]

Voter Registration Deadlines

When is the voter registration deadline?

The voter registration deadline is on the Saturday that is 10 days before Election Day. Additionally, a person may register to vote at the polls on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:11 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:28 [link]

How is the deadline enforced for mailed applications?

If a mailed voter registration application is not received by the voter registration deadline, then it will be treated as an Election-Day registration and the person will be added to the voter roll on Election Day.

However, most people may not register to vote by mail in New Hampshire; only if the person is out of town or is unable to register in person due to a disability may submit a voter registration application by mail.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:16 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:16 [link]

When must a voter make changes to their registration for the changes to be in effect before the person seeks to vote?

A voter may update their voter registration address at the polls on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/16)

N.H. Rev. Stat. 654:7-a [link]

Same-Day Registration

Can voters register and vote on the same day (i.e., does the state offer same-day registration)?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. 654:7-a [link]

Voters Who Have Moved or Changed Their Name

Can people vote if they moved, but did not update their voter registration with their new address?

Yes, registered voters may update their voter registration address on Election Day at their new polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:7-a [link]

Language, Literacy, and Disability Access

Language and Literacy Access

Does the state have any places that must provide election materials in languages other than English, per Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, 76 Fed. Reg. 63602 (Oct. 13, 2011) [link]

Who can help a voter with reading assistance or translation if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote due to inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under state law, any voter who declares to the poll moderator under oath that they need assistance voting may be helped by one or two election inspectors or by of a person of the voter's choice.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:20 [link]

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Disability Access

Who can help a voter with a disability if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to due to blindness or disability may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Under state law, any voter who declares to the poll moderator under oath that they need assistance voting may be helped by one or two election inspectors or by of a person of the voter's choice.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:20 [link]

Does the state have other rules related to access for persons with disabilities?

If a voter is outside the guardrail and cannot enter the polling place due to a disability, then the moderator must have a town or ward clerk deliver an absentee ballot to the voter, allow the voter to mark it, and then return the ballot to the polling place.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:20-a [link]

Early Voting, Absentee Voting, and Other Ways to Vote

Vote-by-Mail

Does the state provide mail ballots to all voters without a request?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:16 [link]

Early Voting/Absentee In-Person Voting

Does the state have early voting/absentee in-person voting?

New Hampshire allows voters who are eligible to vote an absentee ballot to apply for, receive, and cast an absentee ballot in person at the town or city clerk's office. However, only the following voters are eligible to receive an absentee ballot:

  • Voters who will be absent on Election Day from the city, town, or unincorporated place in which they are registered to vote
  • Voters cannot appear in public on Election Day because of a religious commitment
  • Voters who cannot vote in person due to a physical disability
  • Voters who cannot go to their polling place at any time that the polls are open on Election Day due to their employment
  • Voters who cannot go to their polling place at any time that the polls are open on Election Day because they are caring for children or for adults with infirmities, regardless of whether the voter is being paid for offering this care *Military and overseas voters
Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:1 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:17 [link]

Where does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

The town or city clerk's office.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:17 [link]

When does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

From the time absentee ballots become available (which may be approximately 30 days before Election Day) through the day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

What official chooses early voting/absentee in-person voting locations?

None; in-person absentee voting occurs only at the town or city clerk's office.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:17 [link]

Are lists of early voters/absentee in-person voters published? How?

Yes. Each clerk must maintain a list, ordered by polling place, of all voters who have been sent absentee ballots, which should include notations as to which voters have returned their ballots. This list is not open to public inspection, but it is available to candidates on the ballot, or their designees, who must present a notarized request signed by the candidate.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

Absentee Voting by Mail

Can anyone vote absentee by mail without an excuse? If not, what excuses allow a voter to vote absentee by mail?

No. New Hampshire law requires that a voter vote in person at their assigned polling place unless they:

  • Plan to be absent on the day of the election from the city, town, or unincorporated place in which they are registered to vote
  • Cannot appear in public on Election Day because of observance of a religious commitment
  • Are unable to vote in person due to a disability
  • Cannot appear at any time during polling hours at their polling place because an employment obligation requires them to remain physically at work or to be in transit to or from work from the time the polls open until after the time the polls close

Note that some voters may be allowed to request an absentee ballot for the presidential primary election.

Source (confirmed on: 2014-8-1)

http://sos.nh.gov/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=26764 [link]

None [link]

RSA 657:1 [link]

http://sos.nh.gov/RegVote.aspx [link]

RSA 657:1 [link]

Deadline to apply for absentee ballot by mail

The last time that a clerk has to send a voter an absentee ballot is 5 p.m. the day before the election. Voters who apply this late should apply in person at the town or city clerk's office to ensure they receive and can return their absentee ballot by the ballot return deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

How does a voter apply for an absentee mail ballot?

A voter may submit an official absentee ballot application, which is available from the city or town clerk or can downloaded online by clicking here, or the voter may submit an informal written request that includes all the information that is required on the official application. A completed application for an absentee ballot may be delivered to the town or city clerk in person, by mail, or by fax.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:6 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:12 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:13 [link]

Can a voter make an online request for an absentee mail ballot?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:6 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:13 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:12 [link]

Does a voter need to submit any supporting documentation or verification with an absentee mail ballot or absentee mail ballot application? If so, what is required?

No, only the required forms (or a request for an absentee ballot that includes the information required on the official form).

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Official Absentee Ballot Application [link]

Are there restrictions on who may request or turn in an absentee mail ballot application for a voter?

There is no restriction on who may request an absentee ballot application for a voter. However, starting January 1, 2017, any person who distributes absentee ballot applications as part of any communication that advocates the success or defeat of a candidate must be identified in the same manner as political advertisements.

New Hampshire law does not address whether another person may turn in an absentee ballot application for a voter.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:4 [link]

Deadline to return absentee ballots

Absentee ballots must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:22 [link]

Are there restrictions on who may return a voter's absentee mail ballot for them?

An absentee ballot may be returned by the voter's parent, child, sibling, or spouse.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:17 [link]

Are there any special emergency rules that allow a voter to vote absentee by mail if they are unable to make it to the polls at the last minute?

No, but the deadline to submit an absentee ballot application is 5 p.m. the day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

Are lists of people who vote absentee by mail published? How?

No, but the deadline to submit an absentee ballot application is 5 p.m. the day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016 )

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

Presidential-only ballots

No, but the deadline to submit an absentee ballot application is 5 p.m. the day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

Absentee Voting for Military and Overseas Voters

Who is eligible for military/overseas absentee voting?

The following voters are eligible for military/overseas voting:

  • U.S. citizens who are absent from their town or city due to their service in the Armed Forces, the Merchant Marine, the commissioned corps of the Public Health Service, or corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and their spouses and dependents
  • U.S citizens who temporarily live outside of the country, so long as they lived in New Hampshire immediately before leaving the country and have a passport (or card of identity issued by the U.S. Secretary of State)
  • U.S. citizens who are living outside of the country indefinitely, so long as they (or a legal parent or guardian) lived in New Hampshire immediately before leaving the country and have a passport (or card of identity issued by the U.S. Secretary of State). Such voters may vote only in federal elections.
Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:2[ [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:3 [link]

How do voters apply for a military/overseas ballot?

A voter may submit an official absentee ballot application, which is available from the city or town clerk or can downloaded online by clicking here, or the voter may submit an informal written request that includes all the information that is required on the official application. A completed application for an absentee ballot may be delivered to the town or city clerk in person, by mail, or by fax.

Alternatively, a military/overseas voter can apply using the Federal Postcard Application (FPCA), which can be mailed, faxed, or e-mailed to the town or city clerk.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:6 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:12 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:13 [link]

N.H. Sec. of State, UOACVA Voters FAQ [link]

Deadline to apply for a military/overseas ballot

5:00 p.m. on the day before Election Day. However, military/overseas voters should apply well before this deadline to ensure they have enough time to receive, mark, and return their absentee ballot before the ballot return deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:15 [link]

Deadline to return the military/overseas ballot

Ballots must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:22 [link]

Who is eligible to use a write-in absentee ballot? How does it work?

If a military/overseas voter certifies to the town or city clerk that they will be unable to receive, mark, and return an absentee ballot sent no later than 45 days before an election by Election Day may apply for a write-in absentee ballot. The write-in ballot will be sent to the voter by mail or electronically, at the voter's request. In completing the ballot, the voter may designate a candidate by writing in the name of the candidate or by writing in the name of a political party next to the title of the office, in which case the ballot will be counted for that office for the candidate of the political party.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 657:10-a [link]

On Election Day

Where do you vote in person?

Where do you vote in person?

At a central polling place in the city or town, or at the polling place located in the voting district where the voter lives.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 658:11 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 658:18 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 658:10 [link]

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

At a minimum, cities and towns must keep the polls open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:4 [link]

In the Voting Booth

Can a voter bring children into the voting booth with them?

Yes, with the permission of election officers.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:21 [link]

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

Campaigning, Electioneering, and Recording Devices

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering during early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Within a building where an election is being held, no candidate, and no person or who is representing or working for a candidate, may distribute or post any campaign material (including a poster, card, handbill, placard, picture, or circular).

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:43 [link]

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering on Election Day?

Within a building where an election is being held, no candidate, and no person or who is representing or working for a candidate, may distribute or post any campaign material (including a poster, card, handbill, placard, picture, or circular).

Additionally, campaigning is prohibited within a corridor 10 feet wide and extending a distance from the entrance door of the building as determined by the moderator where the election is being held.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:43 [link]

Can a voter wear a button or t-shirt with a candidate's name or logo on it into the polling place when they vote?

New Hampshire law does not specifically prohibit wearing buttons or clothes with campaign message on them while voting.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:43 [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

Yes, digital devices are permitted by voters.

State law does not prohibit ballot photography, but local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 10/17/2016)

Rideout v. Gardner, No. 15-2021 (1st Cir. Sept. 28, 2016) [link]

RSA § 659:35(I) [link]

*NEW 2** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) outside the polling place but within the zone around the polling place where campaigning/electioneering is banned?

State law does not separately address this issue (see previous question).

Who's at the Polls?

Can persons other than election workers observe inside the polls?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:4 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:5 [link]

What are observers inside the polls called in the state?

Challengers.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:4 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:5 [link]

Does the state establish requirements to observe inside the polls?

The Attorney General and any state political party committee may appoint one challenger per polling place in the state, and a town or city political party committee may appoint one challenger per polling place in the town or city. Appointments must be made in writing.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:4 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:5[ [link]

*NEW 3* Can a poll observer use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) in the polling place?

State law does not address this issue. Local practices may vary.

Source (confirmed on: 10/13/2016)

Rideout v. Gardner, No. 15-2021 (1st Cir. Sept. 28, 2016) [link]

RSA § 659:35(I) [link]

Are there other rules on what poll observers can or cannot do?

Challengers must be allowed to see and hear every person who offers to vote. Challengers may also challenge a person's right to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:4 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 666:5 [link]

Provisional Voting and Voters at the Wrong Polling Place

When should a voter be offered a provisional ballot?

New Hampshire does not offer provisional ballots.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

NCSL: Provisional Ballots [link]

Ballot Shortages/Voting Machine Malfunctions

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a polling place runs out of printed ballots? Are handwritten/photocopied ballots allowed?

If a polling place runs out of ballots, the city or town clerk must prepare unofficial ballots, and voters must use these unofficial ballots. Handwritten or photocopied ballots are not allowed.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 658:35 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 659:24 [link]

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a voting machine breaks or malfunctions?

If a voting machine breaks, it must be immediately repaired or replaced with a functional voting machine if possible. Otherwise, the town or city clerk must prepare unofficial paper ballots that voters must use.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Admin. Code, Ballot L. Comm'n 606.04 [link]

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 658:35 [link]

Voter ID and Challenges

Voter ID

Who must show ID to vote?

All voters.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:13 [link]

Are there any special requirements for first-time voters?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:13 [link]

What ID is acceptable?

Voters must show a valid photo ID on Election Day that has not expired more than 5 years ago (for people who are at least 65 years old, and for people with student ID, the expiration requirement is waived.) Acceptable photo IDs include:

  • A driver's license issued by any state or the federal government.
  • An nondriver’s state identification card issued by the motor vehicles division, department, agency, or office of any state.
  • A US armed services identification card.
  • A US passport or passcard.
  • A valid student identification card, if the card is issued by a college, university, or career school approved to operate in NH; a NH public high school; an accredited private high school in NH; a community college in NH; or Dartmouth College.
  • Any other photo ID that is acceptable to election officials

If a person does not have an ID when they vote, then they call fill out a “challenged ballot affidavit” and poll workers will photograph the voter and attach the photo to the affidavit. The voter can then cast their ballot. If the voter has a religious objection to being photographed, then the poll workers will not take the voter’s photograph. Either way, the SOS will, after the election, send to any voter who did not show ID on Election Day a letter requesting confirmation that the voter actually cast their ballot, and the voter must respond to the letter within 90 days of the date it was mailed.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:13 [link]

Is a student ID an acceptable form of identification?

Yes, if the card is issued by a college, university, or career school approved to operate in NH; a NH public high school; an accredited private high school in NH; a community college in NH; or Dartmouth College.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:13 [link]

Does the address on the ID have to match the address at which the voter is registered?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:13 [link]

If a voter has no ID, are there alternatives such as an oath or witness?

If a person does not have an ID when they vote, then they call fill out a “challenged ballot affidavit” and poll workers will photograph the voter and attach the photo to the affidavit. The voter can then cast their ballot. If the voter has a religious objection to being photographed, then the poll workers will not take the voter’s photograph. Either way, the SOS will, after the election, send to any voter who did not show ID on Election Day a letter requesting confirmation that the voter actually cast their ballot, and the voter must respond to the letter within 90 days of the date it was mailed.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:13 [link]

Do elections without federal offices on the ballot (such as off-year gubernatorial elections) have different ID requirements?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:13 [link]

Challenges to Voters at the Polling Place

Who can challenge a voter at the polling place?

A voter's right to vote can be challenged by any other voter registered to vote in the town or ward, election officials, and challengers appointed by the political committees or the Attorney General.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:27 [link]

What are the allowed reasons on which a voter can be challenged at the polling place?

A voter may be challenged for any of the following reasons:

  • The person seeking to vote is not the person whose name they have given.
  • The person seeking to vote has already voted in the election at the time and place specified in the challenge.
  • The person seeking to vote is disqualified as a voter by conviction of a willful violation of the elections laws, such conviction having been for the offense specified in the challenge.
  • The person seeking to vote is under 18 years of age.
  • The person seeking to vote is not a United States citizen.
  • The person seeking to vote does not live in the town or ward where they are seeking to vote because the person's true residence is in the town or city specified in the challenge.
  • The person seeking to vote does not live at the address listed for that person on the checklist.
  • The person seeking to vote is an incarcerated convicted felon who is currently sentenced to incarceration in the institution specified in the challenge.
  • The person is attempting to vote in a primary and the person is not a declared member of the party with which they claim to be affiliated.
  • The person is ineligible to vote pursuant to some other state or federal statute or constitutional provision specified in the challenge.
Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:27-a [link]

Is there a requirement for the challenger to provide cause or evidence?

Yes. The person making the challenge must have personal knowledge or other reason for probable cause that the voter is ineligible to vote. The challenge must also be "well-grounded."

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:27-a[ [link]

How does a voter defend their eligibility to vote if they are challenged?

A challenged voter will be able to vote a regular ballot after they sign a challenged voter affidavit affirming their eligibility.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:27 [link]

N.H. Code § 659:29 [link]

What are the restrictions on polling place challenges?

Challenges are permitted at the polls on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 659:27 [link]

N.H. Code § 659:29 [link]

State and Local Election Officials

The State Election Authority

Who/what is the state election authority?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 652:23 [link]

Current official

William M. Gardner

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Sec. of State website [link]

E-mail

Elections@sos.state.nh.us

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Sec. of State, Contact the Elections Division [link]

Phone

603-271-3242

TDD Access: Relay NH 1-800-735-296

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Sec. of State, Contact the Elections Division [link]

Address

State House, Room 204

107 North Main Street

Concord, N.H. 03301

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Sec. of State, Contact the Elections Division [link]

Local Election Authorities

What local election official(s) are in charge of major state-level elections (such as the even-year November general elections)?

City or town clerk.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 652:14-a [link]

What is the county-level election official?

None.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 652:14 [link]

What is the municipal-level election official?

City or town clerk.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Code § 652:14-a [link]

Contact information for local election authorities

Click here.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

NH Cities and Towns [link]

The Voter File

Acquiring a Voter File

Under state procedure, who may acquire a voter file?

Any person may view the public statewide voter file in the Secretary of State's office during normal business hours, but they may not print, duplicate, transmit, or alter the data. A person may obtain copies of town or city voter files from the town or city clerk. Political parties, political committees, and candidates may obtain copies of the public statewide voter file from the Secretary of State.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:31 [link]

Who is the state-level contact for acquiring a voter file?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:31 [link]

How much does the state charge for the file?

A person requesting a copy of town or city voter file will be charged $25, plus $0.50 per thousand names or portion thereof in excess of 2,500, plus any shipping costs.

A political party, political committee, or candidate requesting a copy of the statewide voter file will be charged the same amount as above.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:31 [link]

What format is the file available in?

Paper, computer disk, computer tape, electronic transfer, and any other format the state can make it available in.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:31 [link]

Use of the Voter File

Does the state have restrictions on commercial use of the voter file?

Yes; information from a voter file may not be knowingly used, sold, given, or received for the purpose of selling or offering for sale any property or service unrelated to an election or political campaign.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:31 [link]

Does the state have restrictions on non-commercial use of the voter file?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 9/12/2016)

N.H. Rev. Stat. § 654:31 [link]