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Election Administration in Nevada

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Election Types and Dates

Election Dates

Upcoming Primary Elections

For president and vice president, Nevada holds party caucuses instead of primary elections. The Democratic Party's precinct caucuses occur on February 20, 2016; the Republican Party's precinct caucuses occur on February 23, 2016. For other federal and state offices, a primary election will be held on June 14, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

2016 Democratic Caucuses [link]

2016 Election Calendar [link]

2016 Republican Caucuses [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.163 (caucuses) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.175 (primary elections) [link]

Upcoming General Elections

A general election will be held on November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

2016 Election Calendar [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.12755 [link]

How is a nominee determined?

How is a nominee determined (caucus, primary, convention)?

All major party candidates are nominated in a primary election, except for presidential and vice presidential candidates, which are nominated by party caucuses.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.175 (primary elections) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.163 (caucuses) [link]

Political Party Affiliation

Can voters register by party in the state?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.518 [link]

Must voters be registered with a political party if they would like to vote on that party’s candidates in a partisan primary election (i.e., are primaries open or closed)?

Yes, primaries are closed.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.257(3) [link]

When can a voter change or switch their party affiliation?

A voter may change their party affiliation any time before the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.540(5) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.518 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.257(3) [link]

Voter Registration

Who Can Vote?

What are the state's residency requirements for voters?

To vote, a person must have continuously lived in Nevada and the county in which they wish to vote for 30 days, and in the precinct for 10 days, before Election Day. Any registered voter who moves after the voter registration deadline for an election from one county to another in Nevada, or from one precinct to another within the same county, is deemed to still live in their county or precinct of their former addresed for that election.

Additionally, if a voter is homeless or otherwise does not live at a location that has been assigned a street address, then for purposes of registering to vote, the address at which the voter lives is a description of the location at which the voter lives. The description must identify the location with sufficient specificity to allow the county clerk to assign the location to a precinct.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.490 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.486 [link]

Can someone pre-register to vote if they will not be 18 years old by the next election? If so, who?

No. Only people who will be 18 by the next election may register to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.485 [link]

Can 17-year-olds who will be 18-year-olds by the general election vote in the primary?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.485 [link]

Does the state take away the right to vote from persons convicted of certain crimes? If so, what crimes?

Nevadans lose the right to vote upon conviction of a felony.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.540(3) [link]

If people lose the right to vote because of a criminal conviction, can they regain the right to vote? How?

If a person is convicted of a felony for the first time in Nevada, in most circumstances the person will automatically regain the right to vote after completing their sentence, including any period of probation or parole. However, people convicted of a felony in Nevada do not regain the right to vote if any of the following are true: (1) the person has already been convicted of a previous felony in the past, unless the multiple felony convictions arise out of the same act or occurrence; or (2) the person was convicted of a Category A felony; or (3) the person committed a Category B felony involving the use of force or violence that resulted in substantial bodily harm to the victim; or (4) the person was dishonorably discharged from probation or parole. People to whom (1), (2), or (3) applies can regain the right to vote only by receiving an order from a court of competent jurisdiction that restores the person's right to vote or by receiving a pardon from the State Board of Pardons Commissioners. People to whom (4) applies can regain the right to vote only by receiving a pardon from the State Board of Pardons Commissioners.

However, an exception exists for people to whom (1), (2), or (3) applies if they completed their sentences before July 1, 2003; these people automatically regained the right to vote upon completion of their sentences.

If a person is convicted of a felony in a different state, the person will gain the right to vote in Nevada if the person has had the right to vote restored in the state where the person was convicted.

If a person is convicted of a felony in a federal court, the person can regain the right to vote only upon receiving a pardon from the President.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Assembly Bill No. 55 § 71 (2003) (July 2003 exemptions) (see pages 84-85 of PDF) [link]

Nev. Attorney General Opinion No. 96-27 (Presidential pardons) (see pages 82 and 86 of the PDF) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 176A.850 (honorable discharge from probation) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 176A.870 (dishonorable discharge from probation) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 213.090 (Nevada pardons) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 213.154(2) (dishonorable discharge from parole) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 213.155 (honorable discharge from parole) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 213.157 (release from prison) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.540(3) (generally) [link]

Voter Registration Options

Is fully online voter registration available? (i.e., can voters fill in and submit an online application without printing and signing it?)

Yes, all Nevada residents may register online here. To register online, the voter must provide a current and valid Nevada driver's license number or the number from a state ID issued by the Nevada DMV. The voter must also provide the last four digits of their social security number. If the voter cannot provide both of these numbers, the voter cannot register online.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Secretary of State's website [link]

Nev. Admin. Code 293.419 [link]

Does the state accept the National Mail Registration Form?

Yes. Click here to download the form.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

National Mail Registration Form [link]

Is the state required to register voters at public assistance agencies and driver's license agencies, per the National Voter Registration Act of 1993?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

U.S. Department of Justice website [link]

Student-Specific Rules

Does the state have specific rules on students registering to vote or voting?

Students may register to vote using the address they live at while attending school or using the address where they lived at before attending school.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Secretary of State's website [link]

Voter Registration Deadlines

When is the voter registration deadline?

If a person wishes to register to vote by mail, the application must be postmarked by the fifth Sunday before a primary or general election. If a person registers to vote online or in person at the county clerk's office or another location designated as a voter registration location, the application must be submitted by the third Tuesday before a primary or general election, or the third Sunday before a recall or special election that is not held on the same day as a primary or general election. Different rules apply to military and overseas voters (see subsection below on Military and Overseas Voting).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.560 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.5235(7) [link]

How is the deadline enforced for mailed applications?

Postmark - An application should be postmarked by the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.5235(7) [link]

Voter Registration Drives

Does the state require organizations conducting voter registration drives to register?

Yes, if requesting more than 50 forms. Requests for more than 50 voter registration forms at any one time require the organization to file a distribution plan with the Secretary of State, including, without limitation, identification of the county or counties with which the person or group plans to file the completed forms. The form is available at here. It requires the name and contact information of the person distributing the forms, the area of Nevada where the forms will be distributed, and the quantity and control numbers of the applications issued.

The county clerk and Secretary of State record on the completed request form the control numbers assigned to the applications which were provided in response to the request. The state’s voter registration drive guide states that when the drive is complete in accordance with all applicable deadlines, all completed and uncompleted forms must be returned to the county clerk.

Requests for less than 50 forms are made to the county clerk in person, by telephone, in writing or by fax.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nevada Secretary of State's Guide for Conducting a Voter Registration Drive, p. 1 [link]

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.425 [link]

Are there restrictions on getting voter registration forms?

Yes, requests for more than 50 voter registration forms at any one time require the organization to file a distribution plan. Charges may be assessed for requests for more than 50 applications in any 12-month period.

Only the official Nevada Voter Registration Application prescribed by the Nevada Secretary of State and federally authorized voter registration applications are accepted. Alternated or unauthorized voter registration applications are not accepted and they may not be electronically or manually modified. Unauthorized copies of registration applications will also not be accepted.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nevada Secretary of State's Guide for Conducting a Voter Registration Drive, p. 1 [link]

Does the state require any training in order to conduct voter registration drives?

No.

Does the state have restrictions on who may help others register to vote?

No. However, persons assisting voters in completing the application to register to vote by mail must not solicit a vote for or against a particular question or candidate; speak to a voter on the subject of marking his or her ballot for or against a particular question or candidate; or distribute any petition or other material concerning a candidate or question which will be on the ballot for the ensuing election, while registering an elector. Further, a person must not hold himself or herself out to be, or attempt to exercise the duties of, a field registrar unless the person has been so appointed. In addition, persons assisting voters in completing the application to register to vote by mail must not delegate any of his or her duties to another person. A violation of each these requirements is punishable as a Class E felony. Organizations should check with local and state election officials to determine what “assists” means.

Individuals or organizations conducting voter registration drives may assist applicants in filling out a registration form only if requested to do so by the applicant, and those who do so must include the required information.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.505 [link]

Does the state have restrictions on paying drive workers, or additional rules related to payment?

Yes. Canvassers may not be paid based on the total number of voters a person registers. Violations are punishable as a Class E felony. This statute was used to prosecute an organization for using “quotas” to determine whether to retain a canvasser. The “quota” used consisted of terminating people who could not collect a reasonable number of applications. An employee of an organization also was convicted under this statute for conspiring to pay $5 extra, on top of their hourly pay, to canvassers that collected more than 20 applications. The Supreme Court of Nevada upheld the statute as constitutional against arguments that it violated the First Amendment and was unconstitutionally vague.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Busefink v. Nevada, 286 P.3d 599 (Nev. 2012) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.805 [link]

Nevada v. ACORN, No. 09C256778-2 (Nev. Dist. Ct. judgment of conviction Aug. 17, 2011) [link]

Are there restrictions on the voter registration drive offering something of value to a person in exchange for completing a voter registration application?

Nevada law does not address this issue.

Must the registration drive worker sign the completed voter registration application, and must the drive or canvasser place other information on applications?

Nevada law provides that the application must include the mailing address and signature of any person who assisted the applicant in completing the application. Willful violation of this requirement is punishable as a category E felony. Further, if the person who assists an elector with completing the form for the application to register to vote retains the form, the person must enter his or her name on the duplicate copy or receipt retained by the voter upon completion of the form. Violation of this requirement is punishable as a category E felony. Organizations should check with local and state election officials to determine what “assists” means.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.5235 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.505 [link]

Does the state have a rule requiring a receipt or other tracking information to be provided to the applicant?

The state’s voter registration drive guide states, “If you retain completed applications to submit on behalf of applicants, you must enter your information in the designated area of the applicant's receipt at the bottom of the Nevada Voter Registration Application.” State law provides that if the person who assists a voter with completing the form for the application to register to vote retains the form, the person must enter his or her name on the duplicate copy or receipt retained by the voter upon completion of the form.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nevada Secretary of State's Guide for Conducting a Voter Registration Drive, p. 1 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.505(13)(a) [link]

Are there restrictions on copying completed voter registration applications prior to submitting them to the election official, or other restrictions on data entry or disclosure?

Federal law states that whoever "pays or offers to pay or accepts payment either for registration to vote or for voting shall be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than five years." At least one federal appellate court has interpreted "payment" as "intended to include forms of pecuniary value offered or given directly to an individual voter, and indicated the value should be based on "an assessment of the monetary worth of an item from the perspective of the voter receiving the item." That case held that food vouchers could be "payment."

Another example is California's Secretary of State's interpretation of the federal law to mean that "Any type of incentive is considered 'payment,' even things as seemingly innocent as cookies or admission to an entertainment event."

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

52 U.S.C. § 10307(c) [link]

California Secretary of State's Guide to Voter Registration Drives, p. 11 [link]

United States v. Garcia, 719 F.2d 99, 102-103 (5th Cir. 1983) [link]

Is there a time limit for voter registration groups to submit the voter registration applications they collect?

Yes, applications must be mailed or delivered in person to the office of the county clerk within 10 days after it is completed and signed by the applicant.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.5235(15) [link]

What are the consequences for failing to submit applications on time?

A person who willfully violates the requirement to mail or deliver within 10 days after completion is guilty of a category E felony. In addition, a person who provides a voter with a voter registration application and intentionally fails to submit a completed application is guilty of a category E felony.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-01-22)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.5235(16) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.800(5)(c) [link]

Same-Day Registration

Can voters register and vote on the same day (i.e., does the state offer same-day registration)?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2014-06-05)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.560 [link]

Voters Who Have Moved or Changed Their Name

Can people vote if they moved, but did not update their voter registration with their new address?

If a voter moves to another address within the same county after the voter registration deadline without updating their voter registration record, the voter can vote at the polling place assigned to their previous address by affirming their new address orally or in writing to an election board officer.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-11)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.525 [link]

Can people vote if they have changed their name, but did not update their voter registration with their new name?

Yes, they can vote using their former name.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-20)

Interview with Secretary of State's office [link]

Language, Literacy, and Disability Access

Language and Literacy Access

Does the state have any places that must provide election materials in languages other than English, per Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

Yes, Clark County must provide election materials in Spanish and the Filipino language.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, 76 Fed. Reg. 63602 (Oct. 13, 2011) [link]

Who can help a voter with reading assistance or translation if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union. The same requirements apply under Nevada law.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.296 [link]

Disability Access

Who can help a voter with a disability if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of blindness, disability, or inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union. The same requirements apply under Nevada law.

Additionally, if a voter with a disability or who is elderly is voting an absentee ballot and requires assistance marking or signing the ballot, the voter may designate a person to assist them by sending a written statement to the county clerk's office that includes the assistant's name, address, and signature. Upon receiving this statement, the county clerk will send absentee ballots to the voter for all future elections held that year. The assistant who helps the voter mark and sign these ballots must indicate next to the signature line on the ballot that the ballot has been marked and signed on behalf of the registered voter.

Additionally, a voter who is confined to a hospital, nursing home, dwelling, or sanatorium due to disability, age, or illness may request an absentee ballot up until 5:00pm on Election Day, and the voter may designate in writing to the county clerk's office a person to obtain the ballot, deliver it to the voter, and return it to the county clerk's office. This person can also assist the voter mark and sign the ballot, as described above.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2546(6) (assistance generally) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.296 (assistance generally) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.316 (absentee ballot delivery) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3165 (absentee ballot assistance) [link]

Does the state have other rules related to access for persons with disabilities?

Polling places and voting equipment must be accessible to persons with disabilities and persons who are elderly, and election officials must make reasonable accommodations to such people when they vote. Elections officials may also designate centralized voting locations equipped to accommodate persons with disabilities and persons who are elderly.

In addition to polling place accessibility, persons with disabilities and persons who are at least 65 years old may, when applying for an absentee ballot, request that absentee ballots be sent to them for all elections that year. Additionally, persons with disabilities are exempt from the general rule that people who register to vote by mail or online must vote in person for the first election after their registration becomes valid. County clerks must also provide absentee ballots that reasonably accommodate persons with disabilities and persons who are elderly, including but not limited to providing absentee ballots with 12-point type.

Additionally, persons with disabilities and persons who are elderly may request from the Secretary of State any printed election materials that the Secretary of State provides be sent to them in a format that is accessible.

If a voter requires assistance registering to vote because of disability, illness, or other good cause, the voter may request the county clerk send a field registrar to the voter's home to assist the voter register.

Finally, a person who has been declared by a court to be mentally incompetent cannot vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2546(9) (equal access) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.272 (in person voting exemption) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2955 (polling place accessibility) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.296 (accomodations) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.309 (accessible absentee ballots) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.313(2) (absentee ballots for year) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.468 (accessible materials) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.5237 (registration assistance) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 433A.460 (mental incompetence) [link]

Early Voting, Absentee Voting, and Other Ways to Vote

Vote-by-Mail

Does the state provide mail ballots to all voters without a request?

No. However, the governing body of a city may decide to conduct certain city elections entirely by mail ballot, including the city's primary or general elections if only one office or question appears on the ballot, the city's primary or general elections if the offices and questions can be voted on by only voters in one ward, or any of the city's special elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293C.112 [link]

Early Voting/Absentee In-Person Voting

Does the state have early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.356 [link]

Where does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

Each county clerk selects permanent early voting locations that will be open during the entire early voting period, and the county clerk may also select temporary early voting locations that can be open for only a portion of the early voting period. Specific locations may vary by county; voters should contact their county clerk for details.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.356 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3564 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3572 [link]

When does early voting/absentee in-person voting take place?

The early voting period starts the third Saturday before the election and ends the Friday immediately before the election. Permanent early voting locations are open Monday to Friday from 8:00am to 6:00pm during the first week of the early voting period; during the second week, the county clerk may choose to keep the locations open during these same hours or extend the closing time to 8:00pm. On Saturdays during the early voting period, the county clerk must choose at least 4 hours between 10:00am and 6:00pm to open permanent early voting locations. On Sundays during the early voting period, a county clerk may, but does not have to, open permanent early voting locations at any times the county clerk chooses.

Additionally, the county clerk decides at what times during the early voting period that temporary early voting locations will be open. Different temporary early voting locations will not necessarily be open at the same time.

Because the specific times when early voting locations are open varies to some extent by county, voters should contact their county clerk for more details.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 3568 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3564 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3572 [link]

What official chooses early voting/absentee in-person voting locations?

County clerks.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-12)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 3561 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3564 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3572 [link]

Are lists of early voters/absentee in-person voters published? How?

Yes, this information is available through county clerks' offices and as part of the state voter file.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-20)

Interview with Secretary of State's office [link]

Absentee Voting by Mail

Under what circumstances does a voter automatically receive a mail ballot in Nevada?

If a voter lives in an election precinct that contains 200 or fewer registered voters, that precinct is considered a "Mailing Precinct," and the county clerk must mail to each voter in that precinct a mail ballot by 5:00pm on the day before the early voting period begins. The voter can return the ballot by mail, and it must be received by the close of the polls on Election Day. Alternatively, the voter can return the mail ballot in person, or designate a family member to return the mail ballot in person for them, at either the county clerk's office, an early voting location designated to accept mail ballots, or a polling place on Election Day designated to accept mail ballots. If the voter does not wish to vote using the mail ballot they received, the voter may instead cast a regular ballot at either the county clerk's office, an early voting location designated to accept mail ballots, or a polling place designated to accept mail ballots. If a voter in a Mailing Precinct chooses to vote a regular ballot, the voter must provide ID and sign a statement, under penalty of perjury, that the voter did not cast the mail ballot they received. Note that not all Mailing Precincts may have designated early voting locations or designated polling places where voters may return their mail ballot in person or choose to vote a regular ballot; voters should contact their county clerk's office for more details.

Additionally, the governing body of a city may decide to conduct certain city elections entirely by mail ballot, including the city's primary or general elections if only one office or question appears on the ballot, the city's primary or general elections if the offices and questions can be voted on by only voters in one ward, or any of the city's special elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.343 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.345 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.350 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.353 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.355 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293C.112 (city elections) [link]

Can anyone vote absentee by mail without an excuse? If not, what excuses allow a voter to vote absentee by mail?

Yes, anyone can vote absentee by mail without an excuse.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.313 [link]

Deadline to apply for absentee ballot by mail

5pm on the 7th day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.315 [link]

How does a voter apply for an absentee mail ballot?

The voter must submit a written absentee ballot request to the county clerk. Absentee ballot applications are available online here.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.313 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.315 [link]

Nevada Absentee Ballot Application [link]

Can a voter make an online request for an absentee mail ballot?

No statewide online system exists, but county practices may vary; for example, Clark County provide an online application. Voters should contact their county clerk to learn whether their county provides an online application.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Clark County Online Absentee Ballot Application [link]

Does a voter need to submit any supporting documentation or verification with an absentee mail ballot or absentee mail ballot application? If so, what is required?

No, except for certain first-time voters (see question bellow on First-Time Voters).

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.330 [link]

Are there restrictions on who may request or turn in an absentee mail ballot application for a voter?

No, except that a person who distributes more than 500 absentee ballot applications to voters cannot turn in any absentee ballot application that was mailed to a voter.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3095 [link]

Deadline to return absentee ballots

Absentee ballots must be received by the time the polls close on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.317 [link]

Are there restrictions on who may return a voter's absentee mail ballot for them?

Normally, voters may designate only a family member to turn in an absentee ballot for them. A family member who returns the ballot must sign a form affirming, under penalty of perjury, that they are a family member of the voter and that the voter requested their assistance in turning in the ballot.

However, in emergency circumstances, voters may designate any person to deliver an absentee ballot to them and then return it to the county clerk's office for them. These circumstances include when the voter is confined to a hospital, nursing home, dwelling, or sanatorium; or if after the absentee ballot application deadline, the voter is suddenly hospitalized, becomes seriously ill, or is called away from home. In order to designate someone to deliver and return the absentee ballot, the voter must submit to the county clerk's office an emergency request for an absentee ballot by 5:00pm on Election Day. Voters in Clark County may download an emergency absentee ballot application here; voters in other counties should contact their county clerk's office to obtain an emergency absentee ballot application. If no application form is available, the voter should send in their own written request to the county clerk's office. The request must include (1) the name, address, and signature of the voter requesting the absent ballot; (2) the name, address, and signature of the person designated by the voter to obtain, deliver and return the ballot for the voter; (3) a brief statement of the illness or disability of the voter or of facts sufficient to establish that the voter was called away from home after the absentee ballot application deadline; (4) if the voter is confined in a hospital, sanatorium, dwelling, or nursing home, a statement that he or she will be confined there on Election Day; and (5) unless the voter designated an assistant to help mark and sign the ballot, a signed statement, under penalty of perjury, that only the registered voter will mark and sign the ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.330(4) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.316 [link]

Clark County Emergency Absentee Ballot Application [link]

First-time voters

If a first-time voter registered to vote by mail or online, and the voter did not, when registering to vote, provide either a current and valid Nevada driver's license, a number from a state ID issued by the Nevada DMV, the last four digits of their social security number, or a copy of an acceptable ID, then the voter must provide acceptable ID to election officials the first time they vote. A copy of the ID can be sent to election officials either with the absentee ballot application or with the absentee ballot itself. Acceptable identification includes:

  • A current and valid photo identification of the voter which shows their physical address; or
  • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or document issued by a governmental entity, including a check which indicates the name and address of the voter, but not a voter registration card.

However, the following first-time voters who registered by mail or online and did not provide the necessary information when registering are exempt from this requirement:

  • Voters who apply for an absentee ballot in person at the county clerk's office
  • Voters who have their absentee ballot application notarized
  • Voters who are disabled, or who are exempt from voting in person under federal law due to disability or age
  • Military and overseas voters
  • Voters who are entitled to vote by mail under any federal law
  • Voters who live in a Mailing Precinct
Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.272 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2725 [link]

Are there any special emergency rules that allow a voter to vote absentee by mail if they are unable to make it to the polls at the last minute?

In emergency circumstances, a voter may apply for an absentee ballot through 5:00pm on Election Day. These circumstances include when the voter is confined to a hospital, nursing home, dwelling, or sanatorium; or if after the absentee ballot application deadline, the voter is suddenly hospitalized, becomes seriously ill, or is called away from home.

Such voters may designate any person to deliver an absentee ballot to them and then return it to the county clerk's office for them. In order to designate someone to deliver and return the absentee ballot, the voter must submit to the county clerk's office an emergency request for an absentee ballot by 5:00pm on Election Day. Voters in Clark County may download an emergency absentee ballot application here; voters in other counties should contact their county clerk's office to obtain an emergency absentee ballot application.

If no application form is available, the voter should send in their own written request to the county clerk's office. The request must include (1) the name, address, and signature of the voter requesting the absent ballot; (2) the name, address, and signature of the person designated by the voter to obtain, deliver, and return the ballot for the voter; (3) a brief statement of the illness or disability of the voter or of facts sufficient to establish that the voter was called away from home after the time after the absentee ballot application deadline; (4) if the voter is confined in a hospital, sanatorium, dwelling or nursing home, a statement that he or she will be confined there on Election Day; and (5) unless the voter designated an assistant to help mark and sign the ballot, a signed statement, under penalty of perjury, that only the registered voter will mark and sign the ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.316 [link]

Clark County Emergency Absentee Ballot Application [link]

Are lists of people who vote absentee by mail published? How?

Yes, this information is available through county clerks' offices and as part of the state voter file. Additionally, absentee ballot applications are open to public inspection.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-20)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.315 [link]

Presidential-only ballots

Under federal law, any registered voter who moves out of the state after the 30th day before a Presidential election may vote for President and Vice President either in person at the voter's previous state of residence or using an absentee ballot from the voter's previous state of residence.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

52 U.S.C. § 10502(e) [link]

Absentee Voting for Military and Overseas Voters

Who is eligible for military/overseas absentee voting?

"Uniformed-service voters" and "overseas voters" voters are eligible to vote a military-overseas ballot. A "uniformed-service voter" is someone who is:

  • A member of the active or reserve components of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard who is on active duty, or their spouse or dependent; or
  • A member of the Merchant Marine, the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service, or the Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or their spouse or dependent; or
  • A member of the National Guard or state militia who is on activated status, or their spouse or dependent.

An "overseas voter" is someone who is not living in the United States and:

  • Before leaving the United States, the person was eligible to vote in Nevada, and the person remains eligible except for not currently living in Nevada; or
  • Before leaving the United States, the person would have been eligible to vote in Nevada had the voter then been 18 years old, and the person otherwise remains eligible except for not currently living in Nevada; or
  • The person was born outside the United States and, except for not currently living in Nevada, the person otherwise is eligible to vote, so long as (1) the last place where a parent or legal guardian of the person was or would have been eligible to vote before leaving the United States was in Nevada, and (2) the person is not registered to vote in any other state.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.030 (generally) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.060 (overseas voter) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.090 (uniformed-service voter) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.210 (overseas voter) [link]

How do voters apply for a military/overseas ballot?

A registered voter can apply by sending the regular Absentee Ballot Application form to their county clerk or by submitting (by mail or online) a Federal Post Card Application (FPCA). An unregistered voter can register to vote and apply for military-overseas ballot at the same time by submitting an FPCA. Voters can also use the Federal Write-in Absentee ballot (see question on Write-In Ballots below). Applications for a primary election also serve as applications for the general election, even if the application is received after the application deadline for the primary election.

On the application, the voter must indicate whether they wish to receive the absentee ballot by mail or online and whether they wish to return the absentee ballot by mail or online.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.300 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.310 [link]

Nev. Admin. Code § 293D.010 [link]

Deadline to apply for a military/overseas ballot

The 7th day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.310 [link]

Deadline to return the military/overseas ballot

The time the polls close on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.400 [link]

Who is eligible to use a write-in absentee ballot? How does it work?

Any military or overseas voter can use the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot to vote, even if they did not apply for a military-overseas ballot beforehand, so long as the declaration that accompanies the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot is filled out and the ballot is received at least 7 days before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293D.300(5) [link]

Nevada Absentee Ballot Application [link]

On Election Day

Where do you vote in person?

Where do you vote in person?

At the polling place for the voter's district. Voters can look up this information here. Voters may also be able to vote at centralized locations in the county, and should contact their county clerk's office for details.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nevada Secretary of State's website [link]

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

From 7:00am to 7:00pm. Voters in line at 7:00pm must be allowed to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.247 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2546 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.273 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.305 [link]

In the Voting Booth

Can a voter bring children into the voting booth with them?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-20)

Interview with Secretary of State's office [link]

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Are employers required to give employees time off to vote?

Employees are entitled to time off from work to vote if it is impractical for them to vote before or after work. However, they must make this request before Election Day, and their employer can designate the time at which they can leave work to vote. The amount of time they are entitled to depends on the distance from their work to their polling place: if the distance is 2 miles or less, the voter is entitled to 1 hour off from work; if the distance is greater than 2 miles but no greater than 10 miles, the voter is entitled to 2 hours off from work; if the distance is greater than 10 miles, the voter is entitled to 3 hours off from work. The voter cannot be penalized by their employer for exercising these rights.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.463 [link]

Campaigning, Electioneering, and Recording Devices

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering during early voting/absentee in-person voting?

At early voting locations and within 100 feet of their entrances, voters cannot campaign for or against a candidate, ballot question, or political party by:

  • Posting signs relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question, or political party;
  • Distributing literature relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question, or political party;
  • Using loudspeakers to broadcast information relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question, or political party;
  • Buying, selling, wearing, or displaying any badge, button, or other insigne that tends to promote the success or defeat of any political party or a candidate or ballot question to be voted upon at that election; or
  • Soliciting signatures to any kind of petition.

However, a voter cannot be prohibited from voting solely because the voter wears a prohibited political insigne to the early voting location and is reasonably unable to remove the insigne or cover it. In such a case, the election board officer must allow the voter to vote as expediently as possible and then assist the voter in exiting the early voting location as soon as is possible.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.740 [link]

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering on Election Day?

At early voting locations and within 100 feet of their entrances, voters cannot campaign for or against a candidate, ballot question, or political party by:

  • Posting signs relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question, or political party;
  • Distributing literature relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question, or political party;
  • Using loudspeakers to broadcast information relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question, or political party;
  • Buying, selling, wearing, or displaying any badge, button, or other insigne that tends to promote the success or defeat of any political party or a candidate or ballot question to be voted upon at that election; or
  • Soliciting signatures to any kind of petition.

However, a voter cannot be prohibited from voting solely because the voter wears a prohibited political insigne to the polling place and is reasonably unable to remove the insigne or cover it. In such a case, the election board officer must allow the voter to vote as expediently as possible and then assist the voter in exiting the early voting location as soon as is possible.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.740 [link]

Can a voter wear a button or t-shirt with a candidate's name or logo on it into the polling place when they vote?

No, a voter may not wear any badge, button, or other insigne that tends to promote the success or defeat of any political party or a candidate or ballot question to be voted upon at that election. However, a voter cannot be prohibited from voting solely because the voter is wearing a prohibited political insigne and is reasonably unable to remove the insigne or cover it. In such a case, the election board officer must allow the voter to vote as expediently as possible and then assist the voter in exiting the early voting location as soon as is possible

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.740 [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

No, digital devices are not permitted. State law prohibits taking a photograph before and after marking a ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 10/14/2016)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.274 [link]

*NEW 2** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) outside the polling place but within the zone around the polling place where campaigning/electioneering is banned?

No; only members of the media may photograph and use recording devices within the electioneering zone.

Source (confirmed on: 10/16/2016)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.274 [link]

Who's at the Polls?

Can persons other than election workers observe inside the polls?

Yes, any person may be a poll watcher. They must sign a an acknowledgement form before observing at a polling place, but they do not need to be appointed by a political party, candidate, or any other entity.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.245 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.274 [link]

Does the state establish requirements to observe inside the polls?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.245 [link]

*NEW 3* Can a poll observer use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) in the polling place?

State law allows someone "acting solely within his or her professional capacity" to photograph or otherwise record conduct. Recording by members of the public is prohibited.

Source (confirmed on: 10/13/2016)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.274 [link]

Are there other rules on what poll observers can or cannot do?

Yes. A poll watcher cannot:

  • Talk to voters within the polling place;
  • Use a mobile telephone or computer within the polling place;
  • Photograph or record the conduct of voting;
  • Advocate for or against a candidate, political party, or ballot question;
  • Argue for or against or challenge any decisions of county or city election personnel; or
  • Interfere with the conduct of voting.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.245 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.274 [link]

Provisional Voting and Voters at the Wrong Polling Place

When should a voter be offered a provisional ballot?

Under Section 203 of the federal Help America Vote Act of 2002, if a person claims to be a registered voter in the jurisdiction in which the person desires to vote and the person claims to be eligible to vote in a federal election, but the person’s name does not appear on the official list of eligible voters for the polling place or an election official asserts that the person is not eligible to vote, then that person must be permitted to cast a provisional ballot at that polling place. The person may cast the provisional ballot after executing, before an election official at the polling place, a written affirmation stating that the person is (1) a registered voter in the jurisdiction, and (2) eligible to vote in that election. Additionally, any person who votes in a federal election as a result of a federal or state court order, or any other order extending the time established for closing the polls by a state law in effect 10 days before the date of that election, may only vote in that election by casting a provisional ballot. Any such ballot cast must be separated and held apart from other provisional ballots cast for different reasons.

Under state law, a voter should be offered a provisional ballot to vote for a candidate for federal office in any of the following circumstances: (1) the voter's name did not appear as an eligible voter in that election in that jurisdiction; or (2) an election official asserts that the voter is not eligible to vote in that election in that jurisdiction; or (3) the voter registered to vote by mail or online, is voting for the first time since that registration became active, and did not provide the required ID either at the time of registration or when voting at the polls; or (4) the voter declares an entitlement to vote after the polling place would normally close because of a court order or other order extending the time established for the closing of polls pursuant to a law of Nevada in effect 10 days before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

52 U.S.C. § 21082 (federal law) [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3081 [link]

If a voter casts a provisional ballot at the wrong precinct, will the ballot be counted?

Yes, but only if the provisional ballot is cast in a polling place that is located in the voter's congressional district, and only if the provisional ballot the voter casts lists the correct federal offices for that congressional district.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3085(4) [link]

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.270 [link]

Following up on a provisional ballot

A first-time voter who registered to vote by mail or online and failed to provide proper identification when registering to vote or when casting their ballot must provide identification at the county clerk's office or the city clerk's office by 5:00pm on the Friday after Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3085(3)(b) [link]

Finding out if a provisional ballot was counted

Between 8 and 30 days after the election, a voter may call 877-766-8683 or go to the Secretary of State's website to learn whether their provisional ballot was counted.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3086 [link]

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.280 [link]

Nevada Secretary of State's website [link]

Ballot Shortages/Voting Machine Malfunctions

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a polling place runs out of printed ballots? Are handwritten/photocopied ballots allowed?

Handwritten ballots are not allowed; voters must use printed ballots or another system approved by the Secretary of State. Additionally, if an election is totally prevented in a precinct or district because of the destruction or loss of ballots, the Board of County Commissions shall, upon the request of a candidate who was on the ballot, call for a new election to be held in that precinct or district.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.270 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.465 [link]

What is the law or procedure on emergency ballots if a voting machine breaks or malfunctions?

If a voting machine malfunctions, the polling place can allow voters to vote using absentee ballots. The Secretary of State can also order other polling places to accommodate voters who cannot vote at their assigned polling place due to a voting machine malfunction.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.318 [link]

Voter ID and Challenges

Voter ID

Who must show ID to vote?

The only people who must show ID to vote are first-time Nevada voters who registered to vote by mail or online but did not provide acceptable identification with their voter registration application, and certain voters whose voter registration cards were returned-as-undeliverable to the county clerk's office. Acceptable identification at the time of registration includes: (1) the voter's driver's license number or DMV-issued state ID card number, or the last four digits of their social security number, which must match an existing identification record that the state has; or (2) a copy of a current and valid photo identification; or (3) a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or document issued by a governmental entity, including a check which indicates the name and address of the person, but not including a voter registration card.

If a first-time Nevada voter does not provide this identification when registering to vote, and the voter registered by mail or online, then the voter must provide ID when voting. Additionally, if a voter provided a driver's license number, DMV-issued state ID number, or the last four digits of their social security number when registering to vote, but the voter registration card they were mailed was returned as undeliverable to the county clerk's office, then the voter must show ID when voting.

However, the following voters are exempt from this requirement:

  • Military and overseas voters;
  • Voters with disabilities or who are elderly and who has a right to vote by mail under the federal Voting Accessibility for the Elderly and Handicapped Act; and
  • Voters who have a right to vote by mail under any other federal law.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2725 [link]

What ID is acceptable?

For those voters who must show ID at the polls, the following forms of ID are acceptable:

  • A current and valid photo identification, which shows the voter's physical address; or
  • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or document issued by a governmental entity, including a check which indicates the name and address of the person, but not including a voter registration card.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2725 [link]

Is a student ID an acceptable form of identification?

Yes, so long as it is current and shows the voter's address.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2725 [link]

If a voter has no ID, are there alternatives such as an oath or witness?

If a voter is required to show ID at the polls but does not do so, the voter may cast a provisional ballot. The voter must then go to the county clerk's office or the city clerk's office and show the clerk an acceptable ID by 5:00pm on the Friday after Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.3085(3)(b) [link]

Do elections without federal offices on the ballot (such as off-year gubernatorial elections) have different ID requirements?

No, the ID requirements are the same for all elections.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.2725 [link]

Challenges to Voters at the Polling Place

Who can challenge a voter at the polling place?

Any registered voter may challenge any other voter who is registered in the same precinct.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.303 [link]

What are the allowed reasons on which a voter can be challenged at the polling place?

A voter can be challenged for any of the following reasons:

  • The voter does not live at the address stated in the register;
  • The voter is not the person the voter claims to be;
  • The voter is not a member of the political party that is stated in the register or that the voter otherwise claims to be a member of; or
  • The voter already voted in the election.
Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.303 [link]

Is there a requirement for the challenger to provide cause or evidence?

The challenge must be based on the "personal knowledge" of the challenger.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.303 [link]

How does a voter defend their eligibility to vote if they are challenged?

Any challenged voter must submit an written oath to a poll worker, under penalty of perjury, affirming that challenge is not true.

Additionally, if the voter is challenged as not being who they say they are, the voter must either provide photo ID to the poll worker or have a another person vouch for the challenged voter's identity. If the challenged voter is vouched for, the person who vouches must be at least 18 years old, sign a written oath under penalty of perjury affirming the challenged voter's identity, and provide their own photo ID.

Additionally, if the voter is challenged as not living at the address stated in the register, the voter must provide satisfactory ID that shows the voter's actual address.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.303 [link]

What are the restrictions on polling place challenges?

None.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.303 [link]

State and Local Election Officials

The State Election Authority

Who/what is the state election authority?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.124 [link]

Current official

Barbara Cegavske

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Secretary of State's website [link]

E-mail

nvelect@sos.nv.gov

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Secretary of State's website [link]

Phone

775-684-5705

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Secretary of State's website [link]

Address

Elections Division 101 North Carson Street, Suite 3 Carson City, NV 89701-3714

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Secretary of State's website [link]

Local Election Authorities

What local election official(s) are in charge of major state-level elections (such as the even-year November general elections)?

County Clerks, except in large counties that have chosen to appoint a County Registrar of Voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.044 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 244.164 [link]

What is the county-level election official?

County Clerks, except in large counties that have chosen to appoint a County Registrar of Voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.044 [link]

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 244.164 [link]

What is the municipal-level election official?

City Clerks.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293C.220 [link]

Contact information for local election authorities

County Clerk contact information: link

City Clerk contact information: link

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

The Voter File

Voter File Basics

National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) Disclosure Law

Section 8 of the federal NVRA requires that each State maintain for at least 2 years and make available for public inspection and, where available, photocopying at a reasonable cost, all records concerning the implementation of programs and activities conducted for the purpose of ensuring the accuracy and currency of official lists of eligible voters, except to the extent that such records contain information about a person declining to register to vote or information about the identity of a voter registration agency through which a particular voter might have chosen to register.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

52 U.S.C. § 20507 [link]

Acquiring a Voter File

Under state procedure, who may acquire a voter file?

Any person.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.440 [link]

Who is the state-level contact for acquiring a voter file?

The Secretary of State. Voter file requests can be made online through NevVoter here. Questions about the status of a voter file request should be directed to nv_voterlist@sos.nv.gov.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Admin. Code § 293.458 [link]

Secretary of State's website: NevVoter [link]

How much does the state charge for the file?

One cent per name on the list. An exception applies to the state and county central committees of major political parties and the executive committees of minor political parties, which can obtain one free copy of original and supplemental lists for each precinct, district, or county.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.440(1) [link]

What format is the file available in?

The file can be requested in Excel, Access, CSV, and Delimited Width formats. A hard copy of the file can also be requested.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Request for Access to the Secretary of State's website: NevVoter [link]

Statewide Voter Registration List [link]

Use of the Voter File

Does the state have restrictions on commercial use of the voter file?

No, except that the free copies provided to the state and county central committees of major political parties and the executive committees of minor political parties cannot be used for any non-election-related purpose or sold to anyone else.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.440(6) [link]

Does the state have restrictions on non-commercial use of the voter file?

No, except that the free copies provided to the state and county central committees of major political parties and the executive committees of minor political parties cannot be used for any non-election-related purpose or sold to anyone else.

Source (confirmed on: 2015-11-13)

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.440(6) [link]