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Election Administration in Oregon

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Election Types and Dates

Election Dates

Upcoming Primary Elections

The primary election is May 17th, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Oregon 2016 Elections Calendar [link]

Upcoming General Elections

The general election is November 8, 2016.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Oregon 2016 Elections Calendar [link]

How is a nominee determined?

How is a nominee determined (caucus, primary, convention)?

Mostly primaries. Major political parties must nominate their candidates by primary election. A minor political party may nominate candidates using the method outlined in its organizational documents. Presidential preference elections are conducted via primary election as well.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 248.007(7) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 248.009(1) [link]

Political Party Affiliation

Can voters register by party in the state?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Oregon Voter Registration Application [link]

Must voters be registered with a political party if they would like to vote on that party’s candidates in a partisan primary election (i.e., are primaries open or closed)?

By default, yes; Oregon's primaries are closed. However, parties may choose to allow voters who are unaffiliated with a political party to participate their primary election by notifying the Secretary of State at least 90 days before the primary election of their intention to do so. Because Oregon is a vote-by-mail state, unaffiliated voters who wish to receive a party's ballot must apply in writing to the county clerk to receive that party's ballot (when the party allows unaffiliated voters to vote in its primary). The application must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on the 21st day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.365 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.470(3) [link]

When can a voter change or switch their party affiliation?

Any time except during the 20-day period before a primary election.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.247 [link]

Voter Registration

Who Can Vote?

What are the state's residency requirements for voters?

A person must live in Oregon to register to vote in Oregon. A person who is experiencing homelessness or who lives in a shelter, park, motor home, marina or other identifiable location cannot be denied the opportunity to register to vote, and such persons may describing their physical location on the voter registration application instead of providing an exact physical address. Additionally, the mailing address of such person may be the office of the county clerk.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.038(2) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.016 [link]

Can someone pre-register to vote if they will not be 18 years old by the next election? If so, who?

17-year-olds can register to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.016 [link]

Can 17-year-olds who will be 18-year-olds by the general election vote in the primary?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.016 [link]

Does the state take away the right to vote from persons convicted of certain crimes? If so, what crimes?

A person convicted of a felony loses the right to vote while they are in prison.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 137.281 [link]

If people lose the right to vote because of a criminal conviction, can they regain the right to vote? How?

A person's right to vote is restored once they are released from prison. The person must re-register to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 137.281 [link]

Voter Registration Options

Is fully online voter registration available? (i.e., can voters fill in and submit an online application without printing and signing it?)

Yes, but only for voters who have an Oregon driver's license, Oregon driver's permit, or state identification card. Click here to access the website.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.012(1) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.019 [link]

Does the state accept the National Mail Registration Form?

Yes. Click here to download the form.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

National Mail Voter Registration Form [link]

Is the state required to register voters at public assistance agencies and driver's license agencies, per the National Voter Registration Act of 1993?

Yes.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

U.S. Department of Justice website [link]

Student-Specific Rules

Does the state have specific rules on students registering to vote or voting?

If a student presently intends to make where they are attending school their home, they may register to vote at that address. If they consider their residence at school temporary, they may register to vote at their permanent address (such as their parent's address).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.035 [link]

Voter Registration Deadlines

When is the voter registration deadline?

The 21st day before Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.025 [link]

How is the deadline enforced for mailed applications?

Postmark - the application must be postmarked by the voter registration deadline.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.025 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.012(3) [link]

How is the deadline enforced for online applications?

An online voter registration application must be delivered electronically by 11:59 p.m. on the day of the voter registration deadline (the 21st day before Election Day).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.025 [link]

When must a voter make changes to their registration for the changes to be in effect before the person seeks to vote?

The deadline for a registered voter to update their registration information is 8:00 p.m. on Election Day

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.013 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.303 [link]

Voter Registration Drives

Does the state require organizations conducting voter registration drives to register?

No, unless the organization is requesting 5000 or more blank voter registration applications (see question below for details).

Are there restrictions on getting voter registration forms?

If an organization requests more than 5,000 voter registration applications, it must develop and abide by a distribution plan to be included on the request form as well as provide written assurances that unused cards will be returned to the Secretary of State. At the discretion of the Secretary of State, requests for additional voter registration forms may be satisfied by authorizing the requesting person to print the voter registration application at the person’s own expense, according to Secretary of State specifications.

Any person may apply in writing to the Secretary of State for permission to print, copy or otherwise prepare and distribute voter registration application designed by the Secretary of State. The secretary may revoke the permission at any time. All voter registration applications must be distributed to the public without charge.

In addition, state request forms must be submitted for requests for 100 or more voter registration applications. The county official must fill requests for less than 500 applications and the Secretary of State fills requests for 500 or more applications. The Secretary of State must maintain records to determine when an aggregate of 5,000 applications have been provided to any person during the statutory time period.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Admin. R. 165-005-0080 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.171 [link]

Does the state require any training in order to conduct voter registration drives?

No.

Does the state have restrictions on who may help others register to vote?

No.

Does the state have restrictions on paying drive workers, or additional rules related to payment?

Yes, a person may not pay or receive money or another thing of value based on the number of signed voter registration cards a person collects. Employment relationships that do not base payment on the number of signatures collected are allowed. Allowable practices include: paying an hourly wage or salary, using express minimum signature requirements (quota), terminating those who do not meet the productivity requirements, adjusting salaries prospectively relative to productivity, and paying discretionary bonuses based on reliability, longevity and productivity, provided no payments are made on a per signature basis. Violations of the rule are processed as civil penalties. Violations will be calculated by deeming each individual voter registration card that contains signatures that was collected in violation of this rule as a single occurrence.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Admin. R. 165-014-0260 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 260.569 [link]

Are there restrictions on the voter registration drive offering something of value to a person in exchange for completing a voter registration application?

Yes. Oregon law provides that a person, acting either alone or with or through any other person, may not directly or indirectly subject any person to undue influence with the intent to induce any person to register to vote. “Undue influence,” among other things, includes giving or promising to give money or other thing of value. This law does not prohibit the public distribution of registration cards by a person approved by the Secretary of State to print, copy or otherwise prepare and distribute registration cards, even though the distributor incurs costs in the distribution.

Federal law also states that whoever ""pays or offers to pay or accepts payment either for registration to vote or for voting shall be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than five years."" At least one federal appellate court has interpreted ""payment"" as ""intended to include forms of pecuniary value offered or given directly to an individual voter, and indicated the value should be based on ""an assessment of the monetary worth of an item from the perspective of the voter receiving the item."" That case held that food vouchers could be ""payment.""

Another example is California's Secretary of State's interpretation of the federal law to mean that ""Any type of incentive is considered 'payment,' even things as seemingly innocent as cookies or admission to an entertainment event.""

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

California Secretary of State's Guide to Voter Registration Drives, p. 11 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 260.665 [link]

52 U.S.C. § 10307(c) [link]

United States v. Garcia, 719 F.2d 99, 102-103 (5th Cir. 1983) [link]

Must the registration drive worker sign the completed voter registration application, and must the drive or canvasser place other information on applications?

No.

Does the state have a rule requiring a receipt or other tracking information to be provided to the applicant?

No.

Are there restrictions on copying completed voter registration applications prior to submitting them to the election official, or other restrictions on data entry or disclosure?

Oregon law does not specifically address copying by third party voter registration groups, but states that a person may not copy or provide to another person a copy of an individual’s signature submitted under the election law for voter registration purposes.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.973(2) [link]

Is there a time limit for voter registration groups to submit the voter registration applications they collect?

Yes. Voter registration groups must forward completed voter registration forms to the county clerk or Secretary of State no later than the 5th calendar day following receipt.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.012(2)(a) [link]

What are the consequences for failing to submit applications on time?

Oregon law does not specifically address the penalty, but there is a catch-all provision that allows for a civil penalty not to exceed $1000 for each violation of any election law for which a civil penalty is not otherwise provided in law.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 260.995 [link]

Same-Day Registration

Can voters register and vote on the same day (i.e., does the state offer same-day registration)?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.025 [link]

Voters Who Have Moved or Changed Their Name

Can people vote if they moved, but did not update their voter registration with their new address?

Yes, voters may update their voter registration record with their new address any time before 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. However, if the voter updates their registration record within 5 days before Election Day, the voter must travel in person to the county clerk's office to obtain their ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.303 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.307 [link]

Can people vote if they have changed their name, but did not update their voter registration with their new name?

Yes; for one election, a voter can cast a ballot using their old name. Alternatively, voters may update their voter registration record with their new name up until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. However, if the voter updates their registration record within 5 days before Election Day, the voter must travel in person to the county clerk's office to obtain their ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.303 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.307 [link]

Language, Literacy, and Disability Access

Language and Literacy Access

Does the state have any places that must provide election materials in languages other than English, per Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Voting Rights Act Amendments of 2006, Determinations Under Section 203, 76 Fed. Reg. 63602 (Oct. 13, 2011) [link]

Does the state have any other rules about providing election materials in languages other than English?

A county elections official may choose to prepare and make available an official ballot translated into Spanish for any election. The county election official must notify the Secretary of State at least 70 days before Election Day of their intention to do so.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Admin. R. § 165-007-0280 [link]

Who can help a voter with reading assistance or translation if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to vote due to inability to read or write may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Additionally, state law allows a voter who is in the county and cannot read or write to request from assistance from the county clerk, who will send two people from different political parties to help the voter mark their ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.445 [link]

Disability Access

Who can help a voter with a disability if they can't vote on their own?

Under Section 208 of the federal Voting Rights Act, any voter who requires assistance to due to blindness or disability may be given assistance by a person of the voter's choice, other than the voter's employer, an agent of that employer, or an officer or agent of the voter's union.

Additionally, state law allows a voter who is in the county and cannot read or write to request from assistance from the county clerk, who will send two people from different political parties to help the voter mark their ballot.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

52 U.S.C. § 10508 (federal law) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.445 [link]

Does the state have other rules related to access for persons with disabilities?

Any voter who is unable, because of a disability, to sign their name by hand may use a signature stamp or other indicator on their voter registration application and any other election document requiring the voter's signature. Before a voter may use a signature stamp or other indicator on an election document, the voter must attest that the voter needs to use a signature stamp or other indicator because of a disability on a form provided by the county clerk.

Additionally, persons who are adjudicated incompetent to vote lose the right to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Const. art. 2, § 3 [link]

Or. Admin. R. 165-005-0150 [link]

Early Voting, Absentee Voting, and Other Ways to Vote

Vote-by-Mail

Does the state provide mail ballots to all voters without a request?

Yes, Oregon is a vote-by-mail state. Therefore, a ballot will automatically be mailed to every registered voter for each election that they are eligible to vote in. Ballots will be mailed to registered voters between the 20th and 14th days before Election Day. After marking their ballot, the voter can return the ballot by mail, by delivering it in person to the county clerk's office, or by depositing it at a ballot drop site designated by the county clerk. Each county must have at least one drop site for every 30,000 active registered voters in the county and no fewer than 2 drop sites for countywide elections. To find a drop site, click here.

The voter must ensure that their marked ballot is received at the county clerk's office (either by mail or personal delivery) or is deposited at a drop site no later than 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. If a voter casts their ballot after the Wednesday before an election, the ballot should be delivered to the county clerk's office or deposited at a drop box site to ensure it is counted. If another person returns a voter's ballot for them, they must do soon within 2 days of receiving the ballot from the voter.

If a voter wishes, they can also choose to vote in person at the county clerk's office, at another place that issues ballots, or at a voting booth location determined by the county clerk. For general and primary elections, each county must provide at least one voting booth location, and counties with more than 35,000 active registered voters must provide at least one voting booth location for every 20,000 active registered voters.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.472 (voting in county clerk's office or other place that issues ballots) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.474 (voting at voting booth location) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.465 (vote-by-mail elections) [link]

Or. Admin. R. 165-007-0030 (designating Vote by Mail Procedures Manual) [link]

Or. Sec. of State, Voting in Oregon: Learn About Vote by Mail [link]

Or. Sec. of State, Vote by Mail Procedures Manual (general vote-by-mail procedures) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.470 (general vote-by-mail procedures) [link]

Early Voting/Absentee In-Person Voting

Does the state have early voting/absentee in-person voting?

Oregon conducts their elections almost entirely by mail, but voters have the option of marking and casting their ballot in person at the county clerk's office, at any other location that issues ballots, or at a voting booth location designated by the county clerk. For general and primary elections, each county must provide at least one voting booth location, and counties with more than 35,000 active registered voters must provide at least one voting booth location for every 20,000 active registered voters.

Voters can also choose to deposit their ballot at a drop site designated by the county clerk. Each county must have at least one drop site for every 30,000 active registered voters in the county and no fewer than 2 drop sites for countywide elections. To find a drop site, click here.

These options are available starting at the time that ballots are mailed to voters (between the 20th and 14th days before Election Day) and ending at 8:00 p.m. on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.472 (voting in county clerk's office or other place that issues ballots) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.474 (voting at voting booth location) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.470 (general vote-by-mail procedures) [link]

Absentee Voting by Mail

Can anyone vote absentee by mail without an excuse? If not, what excuses allow a voter to vote absentee by mail?

In Oregon's vote-by-mail system, an ""absentee voter"" is defined as a person who is sent a ballot before the regular mailing of ballots.

Any voter who will be away from home during the election can request that they be mailed a ballot early. Click here to download an application, which can be sent to the county clerk's office by mail, fax, or in-person delivery. However, military and overseas voters should not use this application; instead, they should apply using a Federal Postcard Application (FPCA).

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.005(4) [link]

Absentee Ballot Request Form [link]

Presidential-only ballots

Under federal law, any registered voter who moves out of the state after the 30th day before a Presidential election may vote for President and Vice President either in person at the voter’s previous state of residence or using an absentee ballot from the voter’s previous state of residence.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

52 U.S.C. § 10502(e) [link]

Absentee Voting for Military and Overseas Voters

Who is eligible for military/overseas absentee voting?

A person is eligible as a ""military or overseas voter"" if they are an Oregon resident who is absent from their home and fall into one of the following categories:

  • The person is in the Armed Forces of the United States or has been discharged from the Armed Forces of the United States for no more than 30 days
  • The person serving in the Merchant Marine of the United States or has been discharged from the Merchant Marine of the United States for no more than 30 days
    • The person is temporarily living outside the territorial limits of the United States and the District of Columbia

Additionally, the spouse and dependents of one of the above voters is eligible to vote a military/overseas ballot if either (1) they are temporarily absent from their home in Oregon, or (2) they have no home in Oregon but intend to live in Oregon.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.530 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.510 [link]

How do voters apply for a military/overseas ballot?

By using the Federal Postcard Application (FPCA), which may be sent to their county clerk or the Secretary of State by mail, e-mail or fax.

Alternatively, a military or overseas voter can send a written request for a ballot with the following information:

  • The name and current mailing address of the applicant;
  • A statement that the applicant is a citizen of the United States;
  • A statement that the applicant will be 18 years of age or older on the date of the election;
  • A statement that for more than 20 days preceding the election the applicant's home residence has been in this state, and giving the address of the last home residence;
  • A statement of the facts that qualify the applicant as a military or overseas elector or as the spouse or a dependent of a military or overseas elector;
  • A statement that the applicant is not requesting a ballot from any other state and is not voting in any other manner in the election except by the requested ballot; and
  • If the applicant desires to vote in a primary election, a designation of the applicant's political party affiliation or a statement that the applicant is not affiliated with any political party. An applicant not affiliated with any political party may request a ballot for a major political party, but they will be sent that party's ballot only if the party allows unaffiliated voters to participate in its primary.

After submitting an application, the voter will be sent a military/overseas ballot in every future election until the voter otherwise notifies the county clerk or the voter is no longer eligible to vote in the county.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.550 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.540 [link]

Deadline to apply for a military/overseas ballot

The application must be received no later than the 5th day before Election Day if the voter wishes to receive their ballot by mail. If the application is received later, the voter will need to pick up their ballot in the county clerk's office.

Note that 5 days before Election Day may not be enough time for military/overseas voters to receive their ballot and return it before the ballot return deadline. Military/overseas voters should request their ballot well in advance to ensure they can receive and return it in time for it to be counted.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.545(3) [link]

Deadline to return the military/overseas ballot

The ballot must be received by the county clerk or Secretary of State no later than 8:00 p.m. on Election Day.

In addition to returning their ballot by mail or in-person delivery, military/overseas voters can choose to return their ballot by fax or e-mail. However, they must include with their ballot a signed statement waiving their right to a secret ballot. The ballot's identification envelope must also be returned with the ballot by fax or e-mail.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.585 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.690 [link]

Who is eligible to use a write-in absentee ballot? How does it work?

No earlier than 45 days before Election Day, a military/overseas voter may apply to receive a ""special absentee ballot"" for a primary or general election if the voter believes that (1) on Election Day, they will living, stationed, or working outside the territorial limits of the United States and the District of Columbia; AND (2) the voter will be unable to vote and return a regular absentee ballot by normal mail delivery in time to be counted. The county clerk shall list on the special ballot the offices and measures scheduled to appear on the regular ballot, if known when the ballot is prepared, and provide space in which the voter may write in their preference. The voter may write in the name of any eligible candidate for each office to be filled or for which nominations will be made at the election, and may vote on any measure submitted at the election.

The application for a special absentee ballot must be made by written request to the county clerk or Secretary of State and include the following information:

  • The name and current mailing address of the applicant;
  • A designation of the election for which the applicant requests a special ballot;
  • A statement that the applicant is a citizen of the United States;
  • A statement that the applicant will be 18 years of age or older on the date of the election;
  • A statement that for more than 20 days preceding the election the applicant's home residence has been in this state, and giving the address of the last home residence;
  • A statement of the facts that qualify the applicant as a military or overseas elector or as the spouse or a dependent of a military or overseas elector;
  • A statement of the facts that qualify the applicant to vote by means of a special ballot;
  • A statement that the applicant is not requesting a ballot from any other state and is not voting in any other manner in the election except by the requested special ballot; and
  • If the applicant requests a ballot for a primary election, a designation of the applicant's political party affiliation or a statement that the applicant is not affiliated with any political party. An applicant not affiliated with any political party may request a ballot for a major political party, but they will be sent that party's ballot only if the party allows unaffiliated voters to participate in its primary election.

Alternatively, a military/overseas voter may cast a Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot for federal offices.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Federal Voting Assistance Program: Oregon [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.550 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.565 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.575 [link]

On Election Day

Where do you vote in person?

Where do you vote in person?

Oregon conducts their elections almost entirely by mail, but voters have the option of marking and casting their ballot in person at the county clerk's office, at any other location that issues ballots, or at a voting booth location designated by the county clerk. For general and primary elections, each county must provide at least one voting booth location, and counties with more than 35,000 active registered voters must provide at least one voting booth location for every 20,000 active registered voters.

Voters can also choose to deposit their ballot at a drop site designated by the county clerk. Each county must have at least one drop site for every 30,000 active registered voters in the county and no fewer than 2 drop sites for countywide elections. To find a drop site, click here.

These options are available starting at the time that ballots are mailed to voters (between the 20th and 14th days before Election Day) and ending at 8:00 p.m. on Election Day.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.472 (voting in county clerk's office or other place that issues ballots) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.474 (voting at voting booth location) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.465 (vote-by-mail elections) [link]

Or. Admin. R. 165-007-0030 (designating Vote by Mail Procedures Manual) [link]

Or. Sec. of State, Voting in Oregon: Learn About Vote by Mail [link]

Or. Sec. of State, Vote by Mail Procedures Manual (general vote-by-mail procedures) [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.470 (general vote-by-mail procedures) [link]

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

What hours are the polls open on Election Day?

Places where a vote can deposit or cast their ballot in person must be open at least 8 hours on Election Day and close no earlier than 8:00 p.m. Any person waiting in line to deposit or deliver their ballot at 8:00 p.m. on Election Day must be allowed to do so.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.470 (general vote-by-mail procedures) [link]

Campaigning, Electioneering, and Recording Devices

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering during early voting/absentee in-person voting?

After ballots are mailed through 8:00 p.m. on Election Day, no person may campaign, circulate any cards or handbills, or solicit signatures to any petition inside a building where voters can cast or deposit ballots or within 100 feet of the building's entrance.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 260.695(2) [link]

Are there restrictions on campaigning/electioneering on Election Day?

After ballots are mailed through 8:00 p.m. on Election Day, no person may campaign, circulate any cards or handbills, or solicit signatures to any petition inside a building where voters can cast or deposit ballots or within 100 feet of the building's entrance.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 260.695(2) [link]

*NEW 1** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) inside the polling place or voting booth?

Oregon is a vote-by-mail state, so this does not fully apply.

There is no prohibition on ballot photography.

Source (confirmed on: 10/17/2016)

Or. Rev. Stat 260.695(8)-(9) [link]

*NEW 2** Can a voter use a digital or recording device (such as a cell phone or camera) outside the polling place but within the zone around the polling place where campaigning/electioneering is banned?

State law does not address this issue. Local practices may vary.

Provisional Voting and Voters at the Wrong Polling Place

When should a voter be offered a provisional ballot?

If a voter's name does not appear on the voter registration list or the voter is updating their voter registration information after ballots have been mailed, the voter must cast a ballot in the county clerk's office. The ballot will be placed into an envelope, and it will not be counted unless and until the county clerk determines the voter was properly registered and eligible to vote.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.408 [link]

Voter ID and Challenges

Voter ID

Who must show ID to vote?

First-time voters in Oregon who registered to vote by mail must provide ID when registering to vote, before they receive their ballot, or at the same time that they return their ballot. Otherwise, the voter's ballot will not count for federal offices. The following forms of ID are acceptable:

  • The voter's Oregon driver's license number, state ID card number, or the last four digits of their Social Security Number, either written on the voter registration application or mailed in writing to the county clerk. The ID number must be valid and the ID unexpired.
  • A copy of an unexpired and valid photo ID that shows the voter's name.
  • A current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that shows the voter's name and address. The address must match the address written on the voter's voter registration application.

The ID can be either shown to the county clerk's office in person or a copy mailed to the county clerk's office.

If the voter does not submit the ID, they may still cast their ballot for state and local offices and ballot measures, but their votes for federal offices will not count.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Oregon Vote by Mail Procedures Manual, p. 69 [link]

Challenges to Voters at the Polling Place

Who can challenge a voter at the polling place?

Any registered, Oregon voter, an elections official or a county clerk. Challenges must be made to the county clerk's office before the voter's ballot is removed from its envelope.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.700 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.415 [link]

What are the allowed reasons on which a voter can be challenged at the polling place?

A challenge may be made on the basis that the voter is not eligible to vote, that their ballot was returned in an unsigned return identification envelope, or that the voter's signature on the return identification envelope does not match the signature in the voter registration record for the voter.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.431 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.700 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.415 [link]

Is there a requirement for the challenger to provide cause or evidence?

Except for challenges based on the voter's signature missing from the return identification envelope or not matching the voter's registration signature, the challenger must describe in writing and under oath the facts on which the challenge is based.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.431 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.700 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.415 [link]

How does a voter defend their eligibility to vote if they are challenged?

The county clerk must mail to each challenged voter a written statement that describes the nature of the challenge. If the person does not provide evidence sufficient to verify the person's registration by the 14th calendar day after the election, the voter's ballot will not count, and the voter's registration will be considered inactive until the voter updates their registration information or the county clerk determines they are validly registered.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.426 [link]

What are the restrictions on polling place challenges?

A challenge cannot take place after the ballot has been removed from its return envelope for processing.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 253.700 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.415 [link]

State and Local Election Officials

The State Election Authority

Who/what is the state election authority?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 246.110 [link]

Current official

Jeanne P. Atkins

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Sec. of State, Meet the Secretary [link]

E-mail

elections.sos@state.or.us

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Sec. of State, Contact Us [link]

Phone

503-986-1518

TTY 800-735-2900

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Sec. of State, Contact Us [link]

Address

Secretary of State, Elections Division

Public Service Building

255 Capitol Street NE, Suite 501

Salem, OR 97310

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Sec. of State, Contact Us [link]

Local Election Authorities

What local election official(s) are in charge of major state-level elections (such as the even-year November general elections)?

County Clerk

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 246.200 [link]

What is the county-level election official?

County Clerk

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 246.200 [link]

What is the municipal-level election official?

The County Clerk in conjunction with the city clerk, auditor, or recorder.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 246.200 [link]

Or. Rev. Stat. § 254.005(2) [link]

Contact information for local election authorities

Click here.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Sec. of State, County Election Officials [link]

The Voter File

Voter File Basics

National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) Disclosure Law

Section 8 of the federal NVRA requires that each State maintain for at least 2 years and make available for public inspection and, where available, photocopying at a reasonable cost, all records concerning the implementation of programs and activities conducted for the purpose of ensuring the accuracy and currency of official lists of eligible voters, except to the extent that such records contain information about a person declining to register to vote or information about the identity of a voter registration agency through which a particular voter might have chosen to register.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

52 U.S.C. § 20507 [link]

Acquiring a Voter File

Under state procedure, who may acquire a voter file?

Any person. A request may not be made within the 44-day period before an election. Click here to download a request form.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.940 [link]

Who is the state-level contact for acquiring a voter file?

Secretary of State

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.940 [link]

How much does the state charge for the file?

500

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.940 [link]

What format is the file available in?

Tab delimited text file, Microsoft Excel file, or Microsoft Access file. It can be provided on a DVD (which can be mailed to or picked up by the requester) or electronically through SFTP.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Admin. R. 165-002-0020 [link]

Request for Statewide and Less Than Statewide Voter List [link]

Use of the Voter File

Does the state have restrictions on commercial use of the voter file?

No person can use information derived from the voter file for commercial purposes. Commercial purposes do not include reselling the file to candidates or political committees for political purposes only.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.940 [link]

Does the state have restrictions on non-commercial use of the voter file?

No.

Source (confirmed on: 2016-07-28)

Or. Rev. Stat. § 247.940 [link]

Or. Admin. R. 165-002-0020 [link]